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Over the past couple of days, we’ve added a new section making it easier for you to access the work of our colleagues in the AfriMAP project. As with the Mapping Digital Media section, you can now also read AfriMAP reports about public media environments in Africa right here on mediapolicy.org.

Visit mediapolicy.org/AfriMAP to learn more. It’s a work-in-progress, and we welcome your feedback!

 

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China and Africa have intensified cooperation in press and media in recent years, in an attempt to break the perceived monopoly of the Western media in the global news market.

Deputy Editor-in-chief of China Radio International Ma Weigong says the two sides have established direct channels to acquire information about each other after years of media cooperation.

“There are no major changes in global media structure as Chinese media just started to increase our voice. It is a gradual process that takes time. We need to pay attention to the effect of the programs we broadcast, which should make Africans closer to the reality in China. “

According to Happison Muchechetere, the CEO of the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation, Chinese media presence in Africa makes the voice more balanced on the continent.

“We showed what the colonizers wanted us to see, think, sleep, eat and behave like them. The Chinese don’t do that. They come with a win-win situation. Before, we only heard about the BBC and what they think about Africa, their own interest. But now there is the other voice, there is another side of the story.”

China and Africa have intensified cooperation in press and media in recent years, in an attempt to break the perceived monopoly of the Western media in the global news market.

Deputy Editor-in-chief of China Radio International Ma Weigong says the two sides have established direct channels to acquire information about each other after years of media cooperation.

“There are no major changes in global media structure as Chinese media just started to increase our voice. It is a gradual process that takes time. We need to pay attention to the effect of the programs we broadcast, which should make Africans closer to the reality in China. ”

According to Happison Muchechetere, the CEO of the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation, Chinese media presence in Africa makes the voice more balanced on the continent.

“We showed what the colonizers wanted us to see, think, sleep, eat and behave like them. The Chinese don’t do that. They come with a win-win situation. Before, we only heard about the BBC and what they think about Africa, their own interest. But now there is the other voice, there is another side of the story.”

[Originally published here on the WITNESS Hub Blog.]

How does ballot-stealing in Zimbabwe work? British newspaper the Guardian smuggled a camera to a Zimbabwean prison officer in the run-up to the recent election run-off in Zimbabwe to find out.

Shepherd Yuda records secretly as he and his colleagues are forced to vote for Robert Mugabe as one of his lieutenants watches.

Yuda puts it starkly:

This country has become a boiling pot where only stones can survive.

Read more:
Zimbabwe resources from Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch.
Kubatana has extensive resources on Zimbabwe here.

Take action with Avaaz now.

NB – The Guardian does not currently permit embeds of its videos, so we have illustrated this post with Al Jazeera’s use of the footage. If you would like to see the original Guardian piece, click here. More from the Guardian here and here.

[Originally published here on the WITNESS Hub blog.]

There are 16 million refugees and 51 million internally displaced people worldwide, according to the UNHCR’s latest figures [pdf].

That number is so extraordinary, so egregious, that I find it personally difficult to absorb – but this World Refugee Day, there seems to be much more imagery available showing the realities and individual stories of refugees.  This shows the impact it has not only on the individuals affected, but their families and communities, their own and neighbouring countries, on economies and identities, and most graphically, their personal safety and security – this year’s World Refugee Day takes “Protection” as its theme.

Zimbabwe is a particular focus.  The Times has this strong set of images from the recent rioting in South Africa, showing the aftermath for Zimbabwean immigrants.  Human Rights Watch has a similarly powerful photo essay from South Africa, and calls on the South African government to halt deportations of Zimbabweans. And with reports of torture and murder within Zimbabwe continuing, these harrowing images, some taken by Peter Oborne of the UK’s Daily Mail (seen in this BBC report), testify to conditions within Zimbabwe that are precipitating an even worse crisis of internal displacement.

A source I hadn’t come across before is a series of blogs and videos from Ghetto Radio‘s network of correspondents, including this interview from the streets of Johannesburg with a Somali woman who came to South Africa as a refugee, but was left reeling after the recent anti-immigrant violence:

Other perspectives come from DakarNairobi and Lagos.

Elsewhere, Refugees International and Amnesty International throw their spotlight on the ongoing crisis in Iraq, where “an estimated 4.7 million have been displaced both within and outside [the country].”  Reuters has posted a World Refugee Day special here, but I couldn’t seem to get the video to load…

And finally, UNHCR’s Refugee Film Festival runs from today for a week in Tokyo, but details of all the films in the festival online here.