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This paper explores the news trustworthiness and media credibility of The Economist’s news report on 9 July 2009, and the communicative roles of 846 readers’ responses. Theoretically guided by news translation and cultural resistance and the online public sphere, we applied online field observation and discourse analysis and achieved two main findings: First, although the news report covered the Xinjiang riots with comprehensive and attractive details, it violated the core journalism value of media credibility and journalistic objectivity by providing misleading pictures and significant unreliable and biased coverage. Second, the major communicative roles of the online readers’ responses generally match Dahlberg’s six conditions of an ideal online public sphere, which is still challenging but promising to realize.

New paper: Testing news trustworthiness in an online public sphere: a case study of The Economist’s news report covering the riots in Xinjiang, China.

This paper reports survey findings on Libyan university students’ perceptions of the credibility of two local channels – Al Jamahiriya TV and Al Libiya TV – and two pan-Arab television news channels – Al Jazeera TV and Al Arabiya TV. Respondents were asked to evaluate the credibility of these televised news services on a series of five-point bipolar scales (e.g., fair or unfair). In general, the pan-Arab television news services were given higher credibility scores than the local television news services. Higher credibility ratings however were significantly correlated with an increased likelihood of reported watching of both local television news services, but only one of the international television news services (Al Jazeera TV).

This paper reports survey findings on Libyan university students’ perceptions of the credibility of two local channels – Al Jamahiriya TV and Al Libiya TV – and two pan-Arab television news channels – Al Jazeera TV and Al Arabiya TV. Respondents were asked to evaluate the credibility of these televised news services on a series of five-point bipolar scales (e.g., fair or unfair). In general, the pan-Arab television news services were given higher credibility scores than the local television news services. Higher credibility ratings however were significantly correlated with an increased likelihood of reported watching of both local television news services, but only one of the international television news services (Al Jazeera TV).

The last season of The Wire drew particular attention from journalists given its setting at a fictional version of the Baltimore Sun, where show creator David Simon once worked. The concept of paradigm repair was used here to explain journalists’ responses to The Wire. Our qualitative analysis of articles from 44 newspapers, as well as radio transcripts, dealing with the 2008 season shows that a fictional challenge can precipitate vigorous efforts by journalists to restore their reputation after what they regard as an attack on their professional identity and credibility. The [real] Baltimore Sun and other papers where Simon’s journalistic nemeses worked were the most likely to call Simon vindictive and obsessed and to use this to marginalize his stinging critique of corporatized newsrooms.

How did journalists respond to the last season of The Wire – focused partly on journalism newsrooms? New research from the University of Maryland/Rhodes University:

The Wire and repair of the journalistic paradigm

The last season of The Wire drew particular attention from journalists given its setting at a fictional version of the Baltimore Sun, where show creator David Simon once worked. The concept of paradigm repair was used here to explain journalists’ responses to The Wire. Our qualitative analysis of articles from 44 newspapers, as well as radio transcripts, dealing with the 2008 season shows that a fictional challenge can precipitate vigorous efforts by journalists to restore their reputation after what they regard as an attack on their professional identity and credibility. The [real] Baltimore Sun and other papers where Simon’s journalistic nemeses worked were the most likely to call Simon vindictive and obsessed and to use this to marginalize his stinging critique of corporatized newsrooms.

How did journalists respond to the last season of The Wire – focused partly on journalism newsrooms? New research from the University of Maryland/Rhodes University:

The Wire and repair of the journalistic paradigm