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Tag Archives: telecoms

In the bad old days, it was said that half the world was waiting for a phone connection and the other half was waiting for dial tone. If timely, evidence-based policy actions are not taken the new aphorism could be that half the world is waiting for broadband and the other half is waiting for a file to load. The signs of a data tsunami driven by increased smartphone use and applications are already here. Developing countries at the ends of inadequately provisioned and/or competitive backhaul networks are already experiencing degraded broadband performance. It is likely that the BOP will bear the brunt of the resulting forms of exclusion.

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Last month, the Global Network Initiative (GNI) – a multi-stakeholder coalition of ICT companies, civil society organisations, investors and academics – signed a cooperation agreement with another body called Industry Dialogue, or, to give it its full name, Telecommunications Industry Dialogue on Freedom of Expression and Privacy. Why should journalism and media policy people care about this? Two reasons…

First, as Rebecca Mackinnon has pointed out on this site before, a free, open internet is crucial for press and media freedom – and that includes the mobile internet: 

All news organisations – whether their final news product is distributed online, in print, or broadcast – are increasingly dependent on broadband and mobile networks to gather, transmit, compile, and disseminate their reports and investigations. Whether the internet remains open and globally inter-operable affects the ability of all news organisations to obtain fair access to increasingly global or geographically-dispersed audiences.

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Huawei said that with Altech’s operations in the telecommunications, multi-media and information technology (TMT) sectors, it will be able to provide high-end fleet management services, traffic monitoring applications and cloud infrastructure services, to name a few.
Altech will also distribute Huawei devices, such as smartphones and tablets, through its existing Altech Autopage Cellular national distribution network.
The agreement covers countries including South Africa, Angola, Botswana, DR Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Huawei said that with Altech’s operations in the telecommunications, multi-media and information technology (TMT) sectors, it will be able to provide high-end fleet management services, traffic monitoring applications and cloud infrastructure services, to name a few.
Altech will also distribute Huawei devices, such as smartphones and tablets, through its existing Altech Autopage Cellular national distribution network.
The agreement covers countries including South Africa, Angola, Botswana, DR Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.