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“U.S. companies including Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, etc. are all coordinating with the PRISM programme to monitor China,” the People’s Daily said on its official microblog. “To resist the naked Internet hegemony, we will draw up international regulations, and strengthen technology safeguards, but we will also severely punish the pawns of the villain. The priority is strengthening penalties and punishments, and for anyone who steals our information, even though they are far away, we shall punish them!” it said.

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“Above-top-secret details of Britain’s covert surveillance programme - including the location of a clandestine British base tapping undersea cables in the Middle East - have so far remained secret, despite being leaked by fugitive NSA sysadmin Edward Snowden. Government pressure has meant that some media organisations, despite being in possession of these facts, have declined to reveal them. Today, however, the Register publishes them in full.

The secret British spy base is part of a programme codenamed “CIRCUIT” and also referred to as Overseas Processing Centre 1 (OPC-1). It is located at Seeb, on the northern coast of Oman, where it taps in to various undersea cables passing through the Strait of Hormuz into the Persian/Arabian Gulf. Seeb is one of a three site GCHQ network in Oman, at locations codenamed “TIMPANI”, “GUITAR” and “CLARINET”. TIMPANI, near the Strait of Hormuz, can monitor Iraqi communications. CLARINET, in the south of Oman, is strategically close to Yemen.

British national telco BT, referred to within GCHQ and the American NSA under the ultra-classified codename “REMEDY”, and Vodafone Cable (which owns the former Cable & Wireless company, aka “GERONTIC”) are the two top earners of secret GCHQ payments running into tens of millions of pounds annually.” (via REVEALED: GCHQ’s BEYOND TOP SECRET Middle Eastern INTERNET SPY BASE • The Register)

According to a leaked document in which technology companies are invited to offer their services, Egypt’s interior ministry says it wants the ability to scan Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp and Viber in real-time for usage that might “harm public security or incite terrorism”. The ministry asks the unnamed companies for a system that could dredge up “vocabulary which is contrary to law and public morality”. According to the document, this would include “degrading and acerbic ridicule; slander; insult; the use of profanity”, incitement of “extremism, violence and rebellion … demonstrations, sit-ins and illegal strikes”; and “pornography and decadence; immorality and debauchery, and the publication of ways to manufacture explosives”.

The perpass list is for IETF discussion of pervasive monitoring. IETF specifications need to be designed to protect against pervasive monitoring where possible. This list is intended for technical discussions attempting to meet that goal. Discussion is limited to specific technical proposals for improvements in IETF protocols, their implementation or deployment and to IETF process changes aiming to increase the liklihood that development, implementation and deployment of IETF protocols results in better mitigation for pervasive monitoring. Those with proposals are encouraged to embody them in detailed internet-draft specifications, rather than relying solely on email messages. The typical modus-operandi of the perpass list should be to identify a credible piece of work, with identified volunteer effort, and then to find a home for that work within the IETF. Once such a home is identified work should move to whatever other lists are relevant.