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Many brain researchers cannot see the forest for the trees. When they use electrodes to record the activity patterns of individual neurons, the patterns often appear chaotic and difficult to interpret. “But when you zoom out from looking at individual cells, and observe a large number of neurons instead, their global activity is very informative,” says Mattia Rigotti, a scientist at Columbia University and New York University who is supported by the SNSF and the Janggen-Pöhn-Stiftung. Publishing in “Nature” together with colleagues from the United States, he has shown that these difficult-to-interpret patterns in particular are especially important for complex brain functions.

Swiss National Science Foundation – new brain research…

Every morning, without fail, within a minute or two of starting my cycle commute, my eyes start watering, and I look either like I’ve just had some incredibly traumatic news, or I’m having a St John of the Cross moment. I am not alone in this.

Many of the threads that address this issue (just google “watery eyes cycling“, and there’s a flood of them) suffer from the problem that there’s no common scale to describe the severity of the problem. For those with Sjögren’s syndrome, there’s the Schirmer Tear Test, but this is hard to implement in cycling conditions without endangering other road users.

I propose a new standard method for measuring the rate at which tears emerge when cycling:
OPM, or Osbornes Per Minute.

(From The Sun)

Single tear-track of UK Chancellor George Osborne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recording the number of single tear-tracks, or Osbornes, per minute (an interval that permits sufficient drying to distinguish between successive individual lacrimal secretions, and additionally a workable measure of acceleration or deceleration of the phenomenon) is relatively easy for an individual patient (“cyclist”), and, judging by early tests conducted over the past three mornings, the reliability of self-reported incidences is quite high.

[Full text of paper forthcoming*]

*Not actually forthcoming

Many different educational and training sessions focusing on science journalism have been offered to journalists in Africa in the past decades. However, there is still insufficient quality reporting on health, environment, technology and science. We propose a new, flexible and needs-oriented concept for the professionalization of journalists. Its main elements are peer-to-peer mentoring and building of professional associations using online tools for training, networking and journalistic research, a combination of approaches and an in situ delivery. It has been put into practice through the Science Journalism Cooperation (SjCOOP) project in Africa and in the Middle East.

Many different educational and training sessions focusing on science journalism have been offered to journalists in Africa in the past decades. However, there is still insufficient quality reporting on health, environment, technology and science. We propose a new, flexible and needs-oriented concept for the professionalization of journalists. Its main elements are peer-to-peer mentoring and building of professional associations using online tools for training, networking and journalistic research, a combination of approaches and an in situ delivery. It has been put into practice through the Science Journalism Cooperation (SjCOOP) project in Africa and in the Middle East.

“In a recent study, a team of scientists in China examined the time of day when paper downloads occur from a scientific publisher’s website. Controlling for the time zone where the request originated, they were able to see how hard scientists work overall by examining the downloads for a period of a little over a …

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