Archive

Tag Archives: russia

globalvoices:

The Russian government has tightened control over all media platforms, but it’s been especially active in corralling the Internet. News programs and other video content from state Russian television will soon flood top news websites in Russia, creating a monolithic news agenda in a market where independent media outlets have all but disappeared.

According to a new agreement between Pervyi Kanal (state-owned Channel One) and the media holding Rambler & Co., websites like Gazeta.Ru and Lenta.Ru will carry the government-controlled channel’s daily news bulletins, while other websites from the holding might rebroadcast Pervyi’s films, documentaries, and sports programming.

TJournal.ru points out that examples of embedded video content from Pervyi Kanalare already available on Lenta.ru, like this conspiratorial piece about U.S. and U.K. ‘agents’ in Germany. The 34-second video is dropped squarely in the middle of the news story, cutting it in half.

The Kremlin Is Fighting the Internet by Buying It Up

The idea that the Internet was at best controlled anarchy and beyond any one nation’s control is fading globally amid determined attempts by more and more governments to tame the web. If innovations like Twitter were hailed as recently as the Arab uprisings as the new public square, governments like those in China, Pakistan, Turkey, Iran and now Russia are making it clear that they can deploy their tanks on virtual squares, too.

Advertisements

Russia Today, which have been exploring drone use for several years, has recently covered protests in Turkey and Ukraine to test the technology. “Since the 2013 launch of RT’s video news agency (Ruptly), we have been widely testing drone technology and plan to use it in the nearest future in a number of territories where the use of drones for civil purposes does not violate legal restrictions,” a spokesman told Media
Guardian. “The kind of content that drones can deliver is generally well-received by [the] RT audience. But while this technology has several clear advantages, particularly those of access, it is not without its challenges. There are legal limits to drone journalism in many countries, including the United States and Russia.”

This review examines the most recent developments in the regulation of licensing and of the line-up of digital television, as well as related policies in post-Soviet countries.The article has two parts. Part One covers recent developments in Russia’s switchover policies, while Part Two contains an assessment of some worrying trends emerging across both Russia and the other Commonwealth of Independent States countries. It points to a possible new broadcasting landscape designed by the authorities in the process of switchover.

This review examines the most recent developments in the regulation of licensing and of the line-up of digital television, as well as related policies in post-Soviet countries.The article has two parts. Part One covers recent developments in Russia’s switchover policies, while Part Two contains an assessment of some worrying trends emerging across both Russia and the other Commonwealth of Independent States countries. It points to a possible new broadcasting landscape designed by the authorities in the process of switchover.