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During the first decade of the 21st century, Bolivia’s “classic” newspapers have disappeared. Preference for tabloid-size print media was one of the reasons for the extinction of Presencia, the Catholic daily that, since the 1950s, had been the morning paper with the largest national circulation. Ultima Hora, an afternoon paper turned morning tabloid, also disappeared, unable to survive the death of its owner, Mario Mercado. Hoy was born a tabloid but also closed its doors, making room for the new leading opinion papers: La Razón (later acquired by Grupo Prisa) and La Prensa, established as a result of the resignation of La Razón’s founding managers. A new group of journalists, unhappy with the management and political positions of these leading La Paz newspapers, founded Página Siete, perhaps now the most influential independent daily. Only two of Bolivia’s older papers remain: Jornada, which was always a marginal paper because of its sensationalism, and El Diario, which was founded in 1904 and prides itself on being the “dean of the Bolivian press,” although its sales are for the most part guaranteed by its classified ads sections. The biweekly Nueva Crónica y Buen Gobierno is undoubtedly the foremost independent medium for political, economic, social, and cultural analysis.

He has no studio, no recording equipment and no transmitter. But Diallo has a telephone line, a computer and the desire to inform and engage his fellow immigrants of New York City on everything from politics to diet.
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Diallo is one of the hundreds of West African immigrants in the U.S. who use free conference-call services — like those used in office business meetings — to host free radio shows that can be dialed into from anywhere in the country.

The Media Monitoring Project began in 2008 and is intended to provide early warning of genocide, crimes against humanity, ethnic cleansing, and serious war crimes by monitoring the domestic news media (newspapers, radio, television and online sources) in at risk countries. It also seeks to inform policy makers, academics, NGO workers and students about what government-owned media in countries at risk tell their people in their own language. In order to get the best understanding of the situation and provide an overall account of what the people on the ground are being told, the project covers both government-owned and privately-owned domestic media. The project assigns a desk officer to each at-risk country and the desk officer produces weekly reports summarising the relevant content from domestic media, providing a weekly snapshot of the information available to citizens in that country.

Army Radio is something of a media anomaly. It started out more than 60 years ago as a channel for broadcasting military messages to the civilian population of the young Israel during wartime but over time evolved into a hugely popular and almost normal media outlet, except for the fact that it is funded through the defense budget, staffed mostly by soldiers and has a military commander for its chief editor.
Brig. Gen. Yoav Mordechai, the spokesman for Israel’s military, posted his support of the move on his official Facebook page Monday morning, praising Dekel for the “unpopular and brave decision” to ban the song from a station that is “home to the soldiers,” as one of its slogans says. As a former journalist, army spokesman and station commander, Avi Benayahu is familiar with walking the tightrope of a media outlet that is also a military base. Speaking on Israel Radio — the military station’s competition, where Dekel waged rather uncompromising journalism until recently — Benayahu said Army Radio is committed to as diverse and broad a public debate as possible, “but this breadth has limits in a democracy on the defense.”
Israel Radio made a point of playing the song throughout Monday.

Army Radio is something of a media anomaly. It started out more than 60 years ago as a channel for broadcasting military messages to the civilian population of the young Israel during wartime but over time evolved into a hugely popular and almost normal media outlet, except for the fact that it is funded through the defense budget, staffed mostly by soldiers and has a military commander for its chief editor.
Brig. Gen. Yoav Mordechai, the spokesman for Israel’s military, posted his support of the move on his official Facebook page Monday morning, praising Dekel for the “unpopular and brave decision” to ban the song from a station that is “home to the soldiers,” as one of its slogans says. As a former journalist, army spokesman and station commander, Avi Benayahu is familiar with walking the tightrope of a media outlet that is also a military base. Speaking on Israel Radio — the military station’s competition, where Dekel waged rather uncompromising journalism until recently — Benayahu said Army Radio is committed to as diverse and broad a public debate as possible, “but this breadth has limits in a democracy on the defense.”
Israel Radio made a point of playing the song throughout Monday.