Archive

Tag Archives: public service broadcasting

Public service broadcasters (PSBs) are a central part of national news media landscapes. In many countries, PSBs are the first choice of citizens when it comes to news providers. And in perhaps more countries still, PSBs are thought of as specialists in provision of hard news. We test this proposition here using survey data from a large crossnational survey involving indicators of current affairs knowledge and media consumption. Specifically, we examine whether exposure to public versus commercial news influences the knowledge citizens possess about current affairs, both domestically and internationally. We also test, using propensity score analysis, whether there is variation across PSBs in this regard. Results indicate that compared to commercial news, watching PSB has a net positive influence on knowledge of hard news, though not all PSBs are equally effective in contributing to knowledge acquisition. This knowledge gap between PSB and commercial news media consumption appears to be mitigated by factors such as de jure independence, proportion of public financing, and audience share.

Public service broadcasters (PSBs) are a central part of national news media landscapes. In many countries, PSBs are the first choice of citizens when it comes to news providers. And in perhaps more countries still, PSBs are thought of as specialists in provision of hard news. We test this proposition here using survey data from a large crossnational survey involving indicators of current affairs knowledge and media consumption. Specifically, we examine whether exposure to public versus commercial news influences the knowledge citizens possess about current affairs, both domestically and internationally. We also test, using propensity score analysis, whether there is variation across PSBs in this regard. Results indicate that compared to commercial news, watching PSB has a net positive influence on knowledge of hard news, though not all PSBs are equally effective in contributing to knowledge acquisition. This knowledge gap between PSB and commercial news media consumption appears to be mitigated by factors such as de jure independence, proportion of public financing, and audience share.

The research examines the combination of public and commercial broadcasting in Israel, where a unique mixed model with commercial broadcasting under public supervision has been developed. Israel’s media policy is examined here as a case study for a country that is constantly debating the need to protect local culture in a competitive, highly advanced and global media market. Whereas media policy had traditionally been based on the European public broadcasting model, the commercial environment today is different in many ways from the traditional broadcasting sector, as new technologies and global culture are dominating. The mixed model, which was adopted in Europe after the transition to competitive and commercial media, also applies to Israel to date while representing a compromised structure of public, commercial, and new media broadcasting. The paper describes the current incarnation of European-style public service television in Israel, focusing specifically on the often-problematic integration of commercial broadcasting into a state-operated broadcasting system built on the premise of public good. In doing so, it raises some fundamental questions about the continued viability of public television in Israel and suggests that new policy objectives, commercialization, competition, and new technology have become more important than government involvement in the market.

Media Policy in Israel: The New Structure of Public Broadcasting, by Yaron Katz, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel

The research examines the combination of public and commercial broadcasting in Israel, where a unique mixed model with commercial broadcasting under public supervision has been developed. Israel’s media policy is examined here as a case study for a country that is constantly debating the need to protect local culture in a competitive, highly advanced and global media market. Whereas media policy had traditionally been based on the European public broadcasting model, the commercial environment today is different in many ways from the traditional broadcasting sector, as new technologies and global culture are dominating. The mixed model, which was adopted in Europe after the transition to competitive and commercial media, also applies to Israel to date while representing a compromised structure of public, commercial, and new media broadcasting. The paper describes the current incarnation of European-style public service television in Israel, focusing specifically on the often-problematic integration of commercial broadcasting into a state-operated broadcasting system built on the premise of public good. In doing so, it raises some fundamental questions about the continued viability of public television in Israel and suggests that new policy objectives, commercialization, competition, and new technology have become more important than government involvement in the market.

Media Policy in Israel: The New Structure of Public Broadcasting, by Yaron Katz, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel

The existing public broadcasting system is built on the proposition that a certain portion of the broadcast spectrum should be set aside for media with a public mission. However, the emerging craft that is defining full-spectrum public media recognizes that the field of play has expanded tremendously. We are working in accordance with the fact that citizens are not only consuming radio and television over the air, they are downloading, creating, remixing, and sharing all kinds of media on small and large screens, and increasingly, in the street via mobile devices. Multimedia installations once confined to museums are now sprawling out into public spaces exclaiming “this is public media!” Text, image, audio, video and dynamic user-generated submissions are all converging, spawning dynamic new media life forms. Our policies have yet to catch up with this lived practice.