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The Media Reform Lanka initiative aims to broaden and inform the perspectives in which media law, media policy and regulation are debated and determined in Sri Lanka, and to provide a resource for those working in this important field. It seeks to identify and clarify the principles and context of media policy and regulation and to widen the constituency which understands the changing international and technological media context.The aim is to ensure that in an age of increasing globalisation and convergence, civil society is aware of the importance of issues of media policy and law for freedom of expression and the safeguarding of the public interest.
The initiative has involved academic, legal, NGO, government, and civil society institutions in Sri Lanka and encourages them to contribute to the debate.

The Media Reform Lanka initiative aims to broaden and inform the perspectives in which media law, media policy and regulation are debated and determined in Sri Lanka, and to provide a resource for those working in this important field. It seeks to identify and clarify the principles and context of media policy and regulation and to widen the constituency which understands the changing international and technological media context.The aim is to ensure that in an age of increasing globalisation and convergence, civil society is aware of the importance of issues of media policy and law for freedom of expression and the safeguarding of the public interest.
The initiative has involved academic, legal, NGO, government, and civil society institutions in Sri Lanka and encourages them to contribute to the debate.

Senegal President Macky Sall will chair a heads of state roundtable at this year’s African Media Leaders Forum (AMLF) to be held in Dakar on November 8-9.

It was not immediately clear how many heads of state were expected to participate in the roundtable but a conservative number of four was offered.

Another innovation this year is a public debate on “Media and Citizenship” organised in partnership with the Council for the Development of Social Sciences in Africa (CODESRIA) at the Cheikh Anta Diop University on November 7.

Organisers said the debate would act as an important curtain raiser to AMLF 2012 with the aim of engaging the public and linking them to this year’s forum theme, Africa 3.0: Strengthening Media and Governance through Citizens’ Engagement and Innovation.

Senegal President Macky Sall will chair a heads of state roundtable at this year’s African Media Leaders Forum (AMLF) to be held in Dakar on November 8-9.

It was not immediately clear how many heads of state were expected to participate in the roundtable but a conservative number of four was offered.

Another innovation this year is a public debate on “Media and Citizenship” organised in partnership with the Council for the Development of Social Sciences in Africa (CODESRIA) at the Cheikh Anta Diop University on November 7.

Organisers said the debate would act as an important curtain raiser to AMLF 2012 with the aim of engaging the public and linking them to this year’s forum theme, Africa 3.0: Strengthening Media and Governance through Citizens’ Engagement and Innovation.

Chinese government-controlled newspapers have openly criticized the detention of a village official who called for the end of Communist Party rule, an extraordinary move that some media experts see as a sign that Beijing is granting more leeway on free speech.
The campaign is all the more remarkable because Ren Jianyu, 25, was sentenced to a labour camp for posting online messages that called for the downfall of the party’s “dictatorship” – sentiments that would normally mark him out for harsh treatment by China’s media, assuming they gave any coverage at all.
But several outlets – including the influential Global Times tabloid, owned by Chinese Communist Party mouthpiece the People’s Daily, and The Beijing News newspaper – have criticized Ren’s two-year sentence and called for more freedom for people to criticize authorities.
“It’s worrying that people can still be punished for expressing or writing critical thoughts in modern China,” Yu Jincui wrote in a Global Times commentary last week.