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Tag Archives: media regulation

Trolls seek attention in the same way shock jocks and tabloids seek ratings and circulation; through controversy, provocation and emotional manipulation. It’s doubly ironic that the media outlets now leading the anti-trolling campaign are the same ones that have done so much to degrade the quality of public debate on their own platforms. This country already has laws to deal with harassment, defamation, and hate speech.

Writing before the current Euro crisis, Papathanassopoulos and Negrine set out to place the normative debate about Europeanization of identity and the public sphere in a more solid empirical context, by describing the state of development of the media sector in European countries. The analysis is based in ‘political economy’ of the media. If there was a criticism of this excellent book it would be that this key notion is under-theorised: Political economy for these authors consists in issues such as the balance of private and public ownership – where recent years have seen the end of public service monopolies all over Europe and there has been a clear convergence around the ‘dual system’ of public plus commercial broadcasting that originated in the UK and Germany. Political economy refers to the regulatory architecture – where the EU sponsored model of independent, and increasingly ‘converged’ broadcasting and telecoms regulators has become the norm.
The other part of political economy of the media – that concerned with the realpolitik of media power and how it is exercised – lies beyond the horizon of this book, or perhaps buried in its assumptions.

Writing before the current Euro crisis, Papathanassopoulos and Negrine set out to place the normative debate about Europeanization of identity and the public sphere in a more solid empirical context, by describing the state of development of the media sector in European countries. The analysis is based in ‘political economy’ of the media. If there was a criticism of this excellent book it would be that this key notion is under-theorised: Political economy for these authors consists in issues such as the balance of private and public ownership – where recent years have seen the end of public service monopolies all over Europe and there has been a clear convergence around the ‘dual system’ of public plus commercial broadcasting that originated in the UK and Germany. Political economy refers to the regulatory architecture – where the EU sponsored model of independent, and increasingly ‘converged’ broadcasting and telecoms regulators has become the norm.
The other part of political economy of the media – that concerned with the realpolitik of media power and how it is exercised – lies beyond the horizon of this book, or perhaps buried in its assumptions.

The recommendations included in the Agenda are incredibly important to promoting prosperity for the Latino community. Being both a media advocacy organization and a civil rights organization, we are especially pleased with the recommendations made regarding media and telecommunications policy. We believe that these proposals will go a long way towards ensuring that all Latinos are able to be active participants in our democracy,” said Jessica J. Gonzalez, NHMC’s Vice President of Policy & Legal Affairs.
The Agenda […] includes the following items:
a. Encourage a comprehensive Federal Communications Commission (FCC) inquiry into the extent and effects of hate speech in media, and/or an update to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) 1993 report to Congress, The Role of Telecommunications in Hate Crimes.
b. Support FCC policies to expand and promote media ownership diversity.
c. Oppose media consolidation as a race-neutral way to open doors for diverse owners to enter the media marketplace.
d. Ensure that the FCC is collecting thorough data on diversity of media ownership and employment and providing this data to the public in a transparent and easily-searchable format that breaks the numbers down by race and ethnicity.
e. Increase the number of Latinos working at all levels at the FCC. Currently only 3% of FCC staff is Latino, and no Latinos are in leading or decision-making roles.

“The recommendations included in the Agenda are incredibly important to promoting prosperity for the Latino community. Being both a media advocacy organization and a civil rights organization, we are especially pleased with the recommendations made regarding media and telecommunications policy. We believe that these proposals will go a long way towards ensuring that all Latinos are able to be active participants in our democracy,” said Jessica J. Gonzalez, NHMC’s Vice President of Policy & Legal Affairs.
The Agenda […] includes the following items:
a. Encourage a comprehensive Federal Communications Commission (FCC) inquiry into the extent and effects of hate speech in media, and/or an update to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) 1993 report to Congress, The Role of Telecommunications in Hate Crimes.
b. Support FCC policies to expand and promote media ownership diversity.
c. Oppose media consolidation as a race-neutral way to open doors for diverse owners to enter the media marketplace.
d. Ensure that the FCC is collecting thorough data on diversity of media ownership and employment and providing this data to the public in a transparent and easily-searchable format that breaks the numbers down by race and ethnicity.
e. Increase the number of Latinos working at all levels at the FCC. Currently only 3% of FCC staff is Latino, and no Latinos are in leading or decision-making roles.