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Journalists and civil society representatives from Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia taking part in the conference titled “From traditional to online media: best practices and perspectives” will look at international standards and national practices regarding freedom of the media in social media and online broadcast regulation.
[…]
The participants of the conference will have an opportunity to discuss regulatory practices in traditional and online media and examine possible regulatory policy responses in a master class held by by Albany Associates, an international communications firm working with governments and broadcast regulatory agencies.

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Journalists and civil society representatives from Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia taking part in the conference titled “From traditional to online media: best practices and perspectives” will look at international standards and national practices regarding freedom of the media in social media and online broadcast regulation.
[…]
The participants of the conference will have an opportunity to discuss regulatory practices in traditional and online media and examine possible regulatory policy responses in a master class held by by Albany Associates, an international communications firm working with governments and broadcast regulatory agencies.

Without a robust legal and regulatory framework, institutionally protected public and private media and a politically and financially independent broadcast regulator and public service broadcaster, it will not be possible to meet the challenges of digitalization and harmonization with international standards, let alone create a free and vibrant media environment. […] There is also an urgent need for the state to completely withdraw from the media market and to foster an environment conducive to free media and safety of journalists. […] The case of journalist Laszlo Sass showed that there is a need to fully decriminalize defamation as the threat of criminal sanctions for speech offences has the potential to stifle public debate.

Without a robust legal and regulatory framework, institutionally protected public and private media and a politically and financially independent broadcast regulator and public service broadcaster, it will not be possible to meet the challenges of digitalization and harmonization with international standards, let alone create a free and vibrant media environment. […] There is also an urgent need for the state to completely withdraw from the media market and to foster an environment conducive to free media and safety of journalists. […] The case of journalist Laszlo Sass showed that there is a need to fully decriminalize defamation as the threat of criminal sanctions for speech offences has the potential to stifle public debate.

Trolls seek attention in the same way shock jocks and tabloids seek ratings and circulation; through controversy, provocation and emotional manipulation. It’s doubly ironic that the media outlets now leading the anti-trolling campaign are the same ones that have done so much to degrade the quality of public debate on their own platforms. This country already has laws to deal with harassment, defamation, and hate speech.