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Toronto hosts the principal media agglomeration in English‐speaking Canada and the third largest in North America after New York and Los Angeles (Davis, 2011). In this agglomeration are found most of anglophone Canada’s major screen production houses, public broadcasters, and many of its private broadcasters. Many Canadian book, magazine, music, and newspaper publishing headquarters are located in Toronto, as are four of the eight principal Canadian media conglomerates. The agglomeration includes the country’s largest concentration of independent screen content producers, specialty broadcasters, supporting institutions, and many suppliers of specialized services and inputs: sound recording studios, law firms, postproduction services, media marketing and publicity agencies, financial and insurance services, theatrical exhibitors, Internet publishing firms, technical service suppliers, advertising agencies, below‐the‐line crews and their craft unions, and public and private post‐secondary educational programs. Tens of thousands of media microenterprises are present in the GTA (Davis, 2010). All three levels of media policy and program agencies are strongly represented in the city. Altogether the content layer of the Toronto media cluster (including film and television production, book, magazine, music, and interactive media) employed around 40,000 people and generated about $4.5B in revenues in 2007 (Davis, 2011).

Extract from an analysis of the “cognitive-cultural economy” of Toronto.

Toronto hosts the principal media agglomeration in English‐speaking Canada and the third largest in North America after New York and Los Angeles (Davis, 2011). In this agglomeration are found most of anglophone Canada’s major screen production houses, public broadcasters, and many of its private broadcasters. Many Canadian book, magazine, music, and newspaper publishing headquarters are located in Toronto, as are four of the eight principal Canadian media conglomerates. The agglomeration includes the country’s largest concentration of independent screen content producers, specialty broadcasters, supporting institutions, and many suppliers of specialized services and inputs: sound recording studios, law firms, postproduction services, media marketing and publicity agencies, financial and insurance services, theatrical exhibitors, Internet publishing firms, technical service suppliers, advertising agencies, below‐the‐line crews and their craft unions, and public and private post‐secondary educational programs. Tens of thousands of media microenterprises are present in the GTA (Davis, 2010). All three levels of media policy and program agencies are strongly represented in the city. Altogether the content layer of the Toronto media cluster (including film and television production, book, magazine, music, and interactive media) employed around 40,000 people and generated about $4.5B in revenues in 2007 (Davis, 2011).

Extract from an analysis of the “cognitive-cultural economy” of Toronto.

The research examines the combination of public and commercial broadcasting in Israel, where a unique mixed model with commercial broadcasting under public supervision has been developed. Israel’s media policy is examined here as a case study for a country that is constantly debating the need to protect local culture in a competitive, highly advanced and global media market. Whereas media policy had traditionally been based on the European public broadcasting model, the commercial environment today is different in many ways from the traditional broadcasting sector, as new technologies and global culture are dominating. The mixed model, which was adopted in Europe after the transition to competitive and commercial media, also applies to Israel to date while representing a compromised structure of public, commercial, and new media broadcasting. The paper describes the current incarnation of European-style public service television in Israel, focusing specifically on the often-problematic integration of commercial broadcasting into a state-operated broadcasting system built on the premise of public good. In doing so, it raises some fundamental questions about the continued viability of public television in Israel and suggests that new policy objectives, commercialization, competition, and new technology have become more important than government involvement in the market.

Media Policy in Israel: The New Structure of Public Broadcasting, by Yaron Katz, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel

The research examines the combination of public and commercial broadcasting in Israel, where a unique mixed model with commercial broadcasting under public supervision has been developed. Israel’s media policy is examined here as a case study for a country that is constantly debating the need to protect local culture in a competitive, highly advanced and global media market. Whereas media policy had traditionally been based on the European public broadcasting model, the commercial environment today is different in many ways from the traditional broadcasting sector, as new technologies and global culture are dominating. The mixed model, which was adopted in Europe after the transition to competitive and commercial media, also applies to Israel to date while representing a compromised structure of public, commercial, and new media broadcasting. The paper describes the current incarnation of European-style public service television in Israel, focusing specifically on the often-problematic integration of commercial broadcasting into a state-operated broadcasting system built on the premise of public good. In doing so, it raises some fundamental questions about the continued viability of public television in Israel and suggests that new policy objectives, commercialization, competition, and new technology have become more important than government involvement in the market.

Media Policy in Israel: The New Structure of Public Broadcasting, by Yaron Katz, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel

The program aims at contributing to knowledge gaining and capacity building in the areas of media policy and media reform in the region. […] A group of regional experts, in conjunction with local experts of the most valuable expertise resources in Egypt will deliver the program:
Emad Mubarak, executive director, Association for Freedom of Thought and Expression, Egypt.
Professor Hussein Amin, professor, Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, The American University in Cairo, Egypt.
Negad El Borai, attorney at law and senior partner, United Group, Attorneys at Law, Legal Researchers and Human Rights Advocates, Egypt.
Professor Ramy Aly, anthropologist and co-founder of the Public Service Broadcast Initiative, Egypt.
Professor Rasha Abdulla, associate professor, Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, The American University in Cairo, Egypt.
Professor Rasha Allam, affiliate professor, Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, The American University in Cairo, Egypt.
Sawsan Zaidah, journalist and director, Eye on Media, Jordan.
Tarek Atia, managing director, Egypt Media Development Program, Egypt.
Tony Mikhael, director of media monitoring unit, Maharat Foundation, Lebanon.
Yahia Shukkier, journalist, managing editor, Alarab Alyawm newspaper, Jordan.