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Tag Archives: media policy

In this system, the EU’s role – defending the European values of media freedom and pluralism – is further justified by the need to protect its own representative democracy. After all, free and democratic European parliamentary elections could be called into question if some of the member states in which they are held lack media freedom and pluralism.

The fact that the group’s recommendations do not align with much of the media’s reporting on them suggests either that the group’s report overstates its intentions, or that the reading of some media outlets has been skewed. Reports that the group’s recommendations would empower the EU to protect media freedom, not to regulate the media – and even criticism that the recommendations leave too much to national authorities – support the latter interpretation. They also raise questions about why some in the media read so much EU control into the report; maybe the fact that it was an EU report meant more than its content.

This study explores and compares attitudes and feelings of middle-aged British and Swedish Internet non-users as well as their reasons for being offline. The rich qualitative data are conceptualized and presented according to various reasons for non-use, positive and negative feelings regarding non-use, and the positive as well as negative influence of and dependence on social networks. The comparison shows both unique and common perceptions of the British and Swedish respondents, some of which can be attributed to social, economic, or socio-economic factors. However, it also displays vast differences between middle-aged non-users in both countries. The analysis paints a complex picture of decisions for and against the use of the Internet and the need for more research to understand these highly complex phenomena, which cannot simply be attributed to socio-economic backgrounds as has been done in most previous research. The analysis shows that more complex reasons, such as lack of interest or discomfort with technologies, as well as the somewhat surprising finding that social networks can prevent non-users from learning how to use the Internet, as it is more convenient to stay a proxy-user, should be considered in future research and policies regarding digital inequalities.

Living Offline: A Qualitative Study of Internet Non-Use in Great Britain and Sweden – Bianca Christin Reisdorf, Ann-Sofie Axelsson, Hanna Maurin Söderholm

This study explores and compares attitudes and feelings of middle-aged British and Swedish Internet non-users as well as their reasons for being offline. The rich qualitative data are conceptualized and presented according to various reasons for non-use, positive and negative feelings regarding non-use, and the positive as well as negative influence of and dependence on social networks. The comparison shows both unique and common perceptions of the British and Swedish respondents, some of which can be attributed to social, economic, or socio-economic factors. However, it also displays vast differences between middle-aged non-users in both countries. The analysis paints a complex picture of decisions for and against the use of the Internet and the need for more research to understand these highly complex phenomena, which cannot simply be attributed to socio-economic backgrounds as has been done in most previous research. The analysis shows that more complex reasons, such as lack of interest or discomfort with technologies, as well as the somewhat surprising finding that social networks can prevent non-users from learning how to use the Internet, as it is more convenient to stay a proxy-user, should be considered in future research and policies regarding digital inequalities.

Living Offline: A Qualitative Study of Internet Non-Use in Great Britain and Sweden – Bianca Christin Reisdorf, Ann-Sofie Axelsson, Hanna Maurin Söderholm

The Media Reform Lanka initiative aims to broaden and inform the perspectives in which media law, media policy and regulation are debated and determined in Sri Lanka, and to provide a resource for those working in this important field. It seeks to identify and clarify the principles and context of media policy and regulation and to widen the constituency which understands the changing international and technological media context.The aim is to ensure that in an age of increasing globalisation and convergence, civil society is aware of the importance of issues of media policy and law for freedom of expression and the safeguarding of the public interest.
The initiative has involved academic, legal, NGO, government, and civil society institutions in Sri Lanka and encourages them to contribute to the debate.

The Media Reform Lanka initiative aims to broaden and inform the perspectives in which media law, media policy and regulation are debated and determined in Sri Lanka, and to provide a resource for those working in this important field. It seeks to identify and clarify the principles and context of media policy and regulation and to widen the constituency which understands the changing international and technological media context.The aim is to ensure that in an age of increasing globalisation and convergence, civil society is aware of the importance of issues of media policy and law for freedom of expression and the safeguarding of the public interest.
The initiative has involved academic, legal, NGO, government, and civil society institutions in Sri Lanka and encourages them to contribute to the debate.