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Tag Archives: media literacy

Doan, a young Vietnamese journalist, was inspired to join Nguyen’s news literacy project because she sees the dramatic change in consumption habits of young people as alarming. “It is no doubt that instead of newspapers or television, Facebook now becomes the first choice of most Vietnamese people to read and share,” she explains in an email, quoting statistics from Singapore-based digital PR firm WeAreSocial that document a nearly 200-percent increase in Vietnamese Facebook users (from 2.9 million to 8.5 million) between 2011 and 2012.

This study tests the proposition that hostile interpretations of media content can be reduced through news media literacy training. Within the context of the controversy over the adoption of biofuels as an energy source, we employ a web-based experimental design that manipulates subjects’ exposure to media literacy training and then presents them with news coverage on the issue of biofuels. We find strong support for the notion that media literacy affects individuals’ perceptions of media credibility. Exposure to a media literacy video led to increased ratings of story credibility, as well as increased trust in the media to cover both the issue and the news more broadly. Implications of these results are discussed.

This study tests the proposition that hostile interpretations of media content can be reduced through news media literacy training. Within the context of the controversy over the adoption of biofuels as an energy source, we employ a web-based experimental design that manipulates subjects’ exposure to media literacy training and then presents them with news coverage on the issue of biofuels. We find strong support for the notion that media literacy affects individuals’ perceptions of media credibility. Exposure to a media literacy video led to increased ratings of story credibility, as well as increased trust in the media to cover both the issue and the news more broadly. Implications of these results are discussed.

I’ve finally got around to posting my notes for a presentation I gave at a convening in May 2011 on Media, Social Media, and Democratic Governance at Wilton Park (here’s a PDF of the conference programme – and here’s some more about the history of Wilton Park). It was a few months before Cameras Everywhere was published, and it was a much-appreciated opportunity to explain some of the thinking behind the report, and to pull out some underlying themes as they related to the people at the convening: a mix of media development, intergovernmental, governmental, donors and citizen/social media specialists. You’ll find the main themes after the jump (and if you want to read the whole thing, and to find out why the internet is not a horse, go here): Read More