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The concept of diversity has always been an underlying principle in media policy-making and the era of participatory media has not changed that core concern. However, dramatic changes in contemporary media systems suggest a need to reconsider how this complex principle is conceptualized and applied. Social media have brought about a seemingly infinite amount of sources and content by lowering the barriers to participation in the fields of media and communications. Much hope has been attributed to their democratizing potential. However, empirical evidence indicates that much digital media consumption focuses on content provided by few actors, and is becoming polarized. And while the rapid diffusion of new media technologies facilitates more participatory communication, persistent digital divides hinder opportunities for access and production. This article argues that diversity as a policy-making principle needs to be refocused to address these opportunities and challenges regarding the role that media systems can play in fostering citizenship, civil society and participation. Based on existing academic and public/policy discourses, the article constructs a framework of participatory modalities and discusses their relationship with the conventional dimensions of diversity, as well as their relevance in terms of policies and regulation.

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The crisis facing several of Israel’s leading news outlets has sparked an impassioned debate within the Jewish state, with some demanding the government act to preserve media diversity while others say there can be no reprieve for losers in times of austerity.On Thursday, after weeks of uncertainty, Maariv, one of Israel’s leading newspapers, was sold to the publisher of a right-wing daily, despite much opposition from staff.Under terms of the $19 million deal, the paper was acquired by the owner of the conservative Makor Rishon newspaper, who has pledged to keep on around 300 of Maariv’s 377 editorial staff, and around 1,400 others.Many of the newspaper’s journalists threatened to go on strike over the deal, fearing for the future of the paper’s editorial line after its sale to Shlomo Ben-Zvi, a West Bank settler who is close to Israel’s nationalist, religious right.A number of Israeli newspapers have folded in recent years as media ownership grows increasingly concentrated, with players like the top-selling Yediot Aharonot and the mass circulation free sheet Israel Hayom crowding out smaller titles.

The crisis facing several of Israel’s leading news outlets has sparked an impassioned debate within the Jewish state, with some demanding the government act to preserve media diversity while others say there can be no reprieve for losers in times of austerity.On Thursday, after weeks of uncertainty, Maariv, one of Israel’s leading newspapers, was sold to the publisher of a right-wing daily, despite much opposition from staff.Under terms of the $19 million deal, the paper was acquired by the owner of the conservative Makor Rishon newspaper, who has pledged to keep on around 300 of Maariv’s 377 editorial staff, and around 1,400 others.Many of the newspaper’s journalists threatened to go on strike over the deal, fearing for the future of the paper’s editorial line after its sale to Shlomo Ben-Zvi, a West Bank settler who is close to Israel’s nationalist, religious right.A number of Israeli newspapers have folded in recent years as media ownership grows increasingly concentrated, with players like the top-selling Yediot Aharonot and the mass circulation free sheet Israel Hayom crowding out smaller titles.

Besides presenting all of us with an incomplete picture of U.S. life, the lack of Latino voices, as both journalists and sources, means a large and growing segment of the public is being left out of the public debate on issues of critical importance—issues that impact Latinos in particular, like coverage of anti-immigrant politicians like Arpaio, and issues that impact them in different or more severe ways than others, like public education.

Besides presenting all of us with an incomplete picture of U.S. life, the lack of Latino voices, as both journalists and sources, means a large and growing segment of the public is being left out of the public debate on issues of critical importance—issues that impact Latinos in particular, like coverage of anti-immigrant politicians like Arpaio, and issues that impact them in different or more severe ways than others, like public education.