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In this study, the authors examined the perception of Malaysian journalists with regard to the role of the media in Malaysian civil society. A total of 182 journalists participated in the study via self-administered survey questionnaires. Results revealed that Malaysian journalists have mixed views on the role of the media in the Malaysian media environment, which is highly regulated by the government. They are highly supportive of the role of the media as “interpreter”, “disseminator”, “analytical-objective”, “mobilizer” compared to the role of media as “watchdog”, in support of the argument that the country’s socio-political environment shapes media environment, which in turn influences how journalists conceive their roles. Education and training background and years in journalism have no significant influence on their views concerning the importance of the role of the media. Implications of these findings are discussed in this study.

Set to live blue grass music from Down Hill Strugglers, her all-female models presented her latest Fall 2013 creations.

One model presented a profusion of colour which included a lilac-fold coal coat worn over a leaf green shibon knit shirt and a black/grey/cream crystal pleated tartan skirt with a grey leather belt. Other conspicuous features of this creation included a blood orange slip and circle dress with a zero waste mobius accessory.

A blonde model sported a linden wool/mohair tie jacket/coat with leaf green shibori knit dirndl tie collar shirt with a purple/black mini-check pant.

The collection of techy 21st century fabrics and vintage pindots in wool, pinchecks in cotton and pinstripes in nylon was locally produced and presented at just across the street from her showroom to ensure “sustainability, small carbon footprints and zero waste”.

In an interview with Bernama, Yeohlee said the underlying theme for her latest creations was freedom of expression. “I have emphasised comfort and ease in my latest creations. My clothes are uninhibited by the notion of time or seasons, they can be used in any season anywhere in the world,” she said.

Malaysian fashion designer Yeohlee Teng finds inspiration for her Fall 2013 collection in Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech. Perhaps an under-utilised medium for media policy advocates?

Set to live blue grass music from Down Hill Strugglers, her all-female models presented her latest Fall 2013 creations.

One model presented a profusion of colour which included a lilac-fold coal coat worn over a leaf green shibon knit shirt and a black/grey/cream crystal pleated tartan skirt with a grey leather belt. Other conspicuous features of this creation included a blood orange slip and circle dress with a zero waste mobius accessory.

A blonde model sported a linden wool/mohair tie jacket/coat with leaf green shibori knit dirndl tie collar shirt with a purple/black mini-check pant.

The collection of techy 21st century fabrics and vintage pindots in wool, pinchecks in cotton and pinstripes in nylon was locally produced and presented at just across the street from her showroom to ensure “sustainability, small carbon footprints and zero waste”.

In an interview with Bernama, Yeohlee said the underlying theme for her latest creations was freedom of expression. “I have emphasised comfort and ease in my latest creations. My clothes are uninhibited by the notion of time or seasons, they can be used in any season anywhere in the world,” she said.

Malaysian fashion designer Yeohlee Teng finds inspiration for her Fall 2013 collection in Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech. Perhaps an under-utilised medium for media policy advocates?

[Originally published here as part of WITNESS‘s collaboration with Global Voices Online]

When the Malaysian police started accepting crime reports sent in by members of the public from their cellphones, little did they expect that their own misdemeanours would one day be caught in the frame. Malaysians have had to put up with police corruption and misconduct as a part of everyday life. But now blogs and video cellphones have given Malaysians who are exasperated by the lack of action against the police a new and very public outlet. A new Malaysian blog – Polis Raja Di Malaysia (or “Royal Malaysian Police”) – aims to pull together footage documenting police misconduct from video-sharing sites like YouTube and GoogleVideo. The blog promotes itself with the strapline “Police should fight crime, not fight the people”. Cellphone videos on YouTube range, for example, from footage and photomontages of the police breaking up protests to a police officer firing into the air unprovoked while breaking up a fight – as shown below.

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4t6uZ348P-o]

One recent video that hasn’t made it onto Polis Raja Di Malaysia yet, but has been on other blogs, appears to show police officers beating and humiliating two youths in a police cell. It has caused controversy in Malaysia and human rights organisation Suaram calls it “the tip of the iceberg”. The video, which shows a youth being forced to lick his saliva off the floor, was apparently filmed by one of the police officers on his cellphone, and only came to light when he sent the phone in for repairs. A technician uploaded the clip onto the internet, and one viewer sent it in to Malaysia TV3’s Utama Bulletin news programme, which aired it last week.

It’s just one of many alleged cases of police brutality that remain either uninvestigated or unpunished, and this one has only stoked up a controversy because video evidence surfaced – in this case, unwittingly released by the police officer himself. As a result, it seems that Malaysian police officers are now banned from carrying cameraphones. Read More