Archive

Tag Archives: libya

This paper reports survey findings on Libyan university students’ perceptions of the credibility of two local channels – Al Jamahiriya TV and Al Libiya TV – and two pan-Arab television news channels – Al Jazeera TV and Al Arabiya TV. Respondents were asked to evaluate the credibility of these televised news services on a series of five-point bipolar scales (e.g., fair or unfair). In general, the pan-Arab television news services were given higher credibility scores than the local television news services. Higher credibility ratings however were significantly correlated with an increased likelihood of reported watching of both local television news services, but only one of the international television news services (Al Jazeera TV).

This paper reports survey findings on Libyan university students’ perceptions of the credibility of two local channels – Al Jamahiriya TV and Al Libiya TV – and two pan-Arab television news channels – Al Jazeera TV and Al Arabiya TV. Respondents were asked to evaluate the credibility of these televised news services on a series of five-point bipolar scales (e.g., fair or unfair). In general, the pan-Arab television news services were given higher credibility scores than the local television news services. Higher credibility ratings however were significantly correlated with an increased likelihood of reported watching of both local television news services, but only one of the international television news services (Al Jazeera TV).

The purpose of the study was to investigate patterns of major local and non-local news suppliers operating across a range of media – broadcast and print – and relationships between Libyan undergraduate students’ consumption of different news media platforms. A survey was administered to a sample of 400 students at Al-Fateh University using a stratified random sampling approach with sampling strata set by demographic groups. The new TV news services played an important role in attracting young Libyans with information they desire. The spread of new news media sources (TV, radio and print) in Libya has created a new type of news product that transcends national boundaries. The findings indicated that there were distinct news consumption-related population sub-groups defined in part by news platform (TV versus radio versus print) and in part by type of news supplier (local versus international TV news operations). These findings indicated the emergence of new niche markets in news in Libya.

The purpose of the study was to investigate patterns of major local and non-local news suppliers operating across a range of media – broadcast and print – and relationships between Libyan undergraduate students’ consumption of different news media platforms. A survey was administered to a sample of 400 students at Al-Fateh University using a stratified random sampling approach with sampling strata set by demographic groups. The new TV news services played an important role in attracting young Libyans with information they desire. The spread of new news media sources (TV, radio and print) in Libya has created a new type of news product that transcends national boundaries. The findings indicated that there were distinct news consumption-related population sub-groups defined in part by news platform (TV versus radio versus print) and in part by type of news supplier (local versus international TV news operations). These findings indicated the emergence of new niche markets in news in Libya.

On a January evening in 2011, Egypt – with a population of 80 million, including 23 million Internet users – vanished from cyberspace after its government ordered an Internet blackout amidst anti-government protests that led to the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. The following month, the Libyan government, also under siege, imposed an Internet “curfew” before completely cutting off access for almost four days. To help explain exactly how these governments disrupted the Internet, a team of scientists led by the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA) at the University of California, San Diego conducted an analysis based largely on the drop in a specific subset of observable Internet traffic that is a residual product of malware. Many types of malicious software or network activity generate unsolicited traffic in attempting to compromise or infect vulnerable machines. This traffic “pollution” is commonly referred to as Internet background radiation (IBR) and is ubiquitously observable on most publicly accessible Internet links. The analysis marks the first time that this malware-generated traffic pollution was used to analyze Internet censorship and/or network outages, and the researchers believe this novel methodology could be adopted on a wider scale to create an automated early warning system to help detect such Internet reachability problems in the future.