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The aim of this study is a two-fold. Firstly, I explore the Latvian PSB governance and management system in accordance with a normative framework of public value creation, based on the criteria derived from Moore’s seminal work but further developed for theoretical and practical applications here. The empirical analysis includes the identification of factors that characterize PSB governance, management and overall development trends in post-Soviet countries (e.g., Jakubowicz, 2004:63, 2005:9-10, 2008:101-102). They should be taken into account by adapting and implementing the public value management approach in different media and political systems. Secondly, I aim to elaborate recommendations on how to develop Latvian PSB system in accordance with applied public value as a theoretical concept and normative public service management tool. This part of the analysis also encompasses the identification of risk factors that would hinder or limit the development of post-soviet PSB organizations aligned with public value theoretical considerations.

Leva Beitika’s paper on Latvian PSB, from the 2012 RIPEat conference in Sydney.
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The aim of this study is a two-fold. Firstly, I explore the Latvian PSB governance and management system in accordance with a normative framework of public value creation, based on the criteria derived from Moore’s seminal work but further developed for theoretical and practical applications here. The empirical analysis includes the identification of factors that characterize PSB governance, management and overall development trends in post-Soviet countries (e.g., Jakubowicz, 2004:63, 2005:9-10, 2008:101-102). They should be taken into account by adapting and implementing the public value management approach in different media and political systems. Secondly, I aim to elaborate recommendations on how to develop Latvian PSB system in accordance with applied public value as a theoretical concept and normative public service management tool. This part of the analysis also encompasses the identification of risk factors that would hinder or limit the development of post-soviet PSB organizations aligned with public value theoretical considerations.

Leva Beitika’s paper on Latvian PSB, from the 2012 RIPEat conference in Sydney.

[Originally published here as part of WITNESS‘s collaboration with Global Voices Online]

The latest twist in the long-running saga of anti-gay violence and state oppression took place yesterday in Moscow, as an appeals court upheld the earlier lower court ruling to ban Moscow’s Gay Pride March in May 2006. The gay rights activists who brought the case will now attempt to challenge the rulling in the European Court of Human Rights, and they say they expect to win.

As GVO’s Eastern and Central Europe Editor Veronica Khokhlova reported in May 2006, Moscow’s Mayor, Yuri Luzhov, banned the Moscow Gay Pride march from taking place. The religious leaders of Moscow met – on the one issue they could agree – to back his decision and called for violence against anyone who tried to marcha call that was unfortunately heeded. The video below – apparently uploaded to YouTube from a Russian anarchist site – doesn’t directly show the violence that took place, but does give a very immediate sense of the atmosphere in Moscow that day, and of who was involved:

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXHzoONni-k]

Just as sites like YouTube can be used as a dissemination tool for less savoury content, they can also be used as a tool for solidarity and support, and potentially as evidence. In the case of anti-gay violence, users have tried to upload their own footage (as with the videos in this post), and, where first-hand footage is not available, they have uploaded clips from their local TV news (here’s a clip from Serbian TV’s coverage of the 2001 Gay Pride in Belgrade).

And that solidarity and support may well be needed. Human Rights First, a US-based organisation, released a report earlier this year citing an increase both in rhetoric and in hate-crimes of a homophobic or racist nature in Russia (PDF) over the past year. But it’s not just Russia where this is a trend. Since the accession of 8 Eastern European countries to the EU in May 2004, the spotlight has come to rest increasingly on the rise in official, or state, homophobia across Eastern Europe.

The most high-profile manifestation of this is how governments handle Gay Pride marches – which are now held all over the world – in which lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender, or LGBT organisations march to commemorate LGBT rights, and to celebrate LGBT pride.

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