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Army Radio is something of a media anomaly. It started out more than 60 years ago as a channel for broadcasting military messages to the civilian population of the young Israel during wartime but over time evolved into a hugely popular and almost normal media outlet, except for the fact that it is funded through the defense budget, staffed mostly by soldiers and has a military commander for its chief editor.
Brig. Gen. Yoav Mordechai, the spokesman for Israel’s military, posted his support of the move on his official Facebook page Monday morning, praising Dekel for the “unpopular and brave decision” to ban the song from a station that is “home to the soldiers,” as one of its slogans says. As a former journalist, army spokesman and station commander, Avi Benayahu is familiar with walking the tightrope of a media outlet that is also a military base. Speaking on Israel Radio — the military station’s competition, where Dekel waged rather uncompromising journalism until recently — Benayahu said Army Radio is committed to as diverse and broad a public debate as possible, “but this breadth has limits in a democracy on the defense.”
Israel Radio made a point of playing the song throughout Monday.

The research examines the combination of public and commercial broadcasting in Israel, where a unique mixed model with commercial broadcasting under public supervision has been developed. Israel’s media policy is examined here as a case study for a country that is constantly debating the need to protect local culture in a competitive, highly advanced and global media market. Whereas media policy had traditionally been based on the European public broadcasting model, the commercial environment today is different in many ways from the traditional broadcasting sector, as new technologies and global culture are dominating. The mixed model, which was adopted in Europe after the transition to competitive and commercial media, also applies to Israel to date while representing a compromised structure of public, commercial, and new media broadcasting. The paper describes the current incarnation of European-style public service television in Israel, focusing specifically on the often-problematic integration of commercial broadcasting into a state-operated broadcasting system built on the premise of public good. In doing so, it raises some fundamental questions about the continued viability of public television in Israel and suggests that new policy objectives, commercialization, competition, and new technology have become more important than government involvement in the market.

Media Policy in Israel: The New Structure of Public Broadcasting, by Yaron Katz, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel

The research examines the combination of public and commercial broadcasting in Israel, where a unique mixed model with commercial broadcasting under public supervision has been developed. Israel’s media policy is examined here as a case study for a country that is constantly debating the need to protect local culture in a competitive, highly advanced and global media market. Whereas media policy had traditionally been based on the European public broadcasting model, the commercial environment today is different in many ways from the traditional broadcasting sector, as new technologies and global culture are dominating. The mixed model, which was adopted in Europe after the transition to competitive and commercial media, also applies to Israel to date while representing a compromised structure of public, commercial, and new media broadcasting. The paper describes the current incarnation of European-style public service television in Israel, focusing specifically on the often-problematic integration of commercial broadcasting into a state-operated broadcasting system built on the premise of public good. In doing so, it raises some fundamental questions about the continued viability of public television in Israel and suggests that new policy objectives, commercialization, competition, and new technology have become more important than government involvement in the market.

Media Policy in Israel: The New Structure of Public Broadcasting, by Yaron Katz, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel

The crisis facing several of Israel’s leading news outlets has sparked an impassioned debate within the Jewish state, with some demanding the government act to preserve media diversity while others say there can be no reprieve for losers in times of austerity.On Thursday, after weeks of uncertainty, Maariv, one of Israel’s leading newspapers, was sold to the publisher of a right-wing daily, despite much opposition from staff.Under terms of the $19 million deal, the paper was acquired by the owner of the conservative Makor Rishon newspaper, who has pledged to keep on around 300 of Maariv’s 377 editorial staff, and around 1,400 others.Many of the newspaper’s journalists threatened to go on strike over the deal, fearing for the future of the paper’s editorial line after its sale to Shlomo Ben-Zvi, a West Bank settler who is close to Israel’s nationalist, religious right.A number of Israeli newspapers have folded in recent years as media ownership grows increasingly concentrated, with players like the top-selling Yediot Aharonot and the mass circulation free sheet Israel Hayom crowding out smaller titles.

The crisis facing several of Israel’s leading news outlets has sparked an impassioned debate within the Jewish state, with some demanding the government act to preserve media diversity while others say there can be no reprieve for losers in times of austerity.On Thursday, after weeks of uncertainty, Maariv, one of Israel’s leading newspapers, was sold to the publisher of a right-wing daily, despite much opposition from staff.Under terms of the $19 million deal, the paper was acquired by the owner of the conservative Makor Rishon newspaper, who has pledged to keep on around 300 of Maariv’s 377 editorial staff, and around 1,400 others.Many of the newspaper’s journalists threatened to go on strike over the deal, fearing for the future of the paper’s editorial line after its sale to Shlomo Ben-Zvi, a West Bank settler who is close to Israel’s nationalist, religious right.A number of Israeli newspapers have folded in recent years as media ownership grows increasingly concentrated, with players like the top-selling Yediot Aharonot and the mass circulation free sheet Israel Hayom crowding out smaller titles.