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Tag Archives: internet governance

What is needed is a structured process ensuring genuine two-way communication between technical standards bodies and the legal community. In the long term, this should entail collaboration between law schools and professional legal associations, on the one hand, and the Internet-related technical community on the other. This effort must also be genuinely transnational, including both legal and policy experts from a variety of countries, if it is to achieve the goal of minimizing monitoring and compliance costs. Such dialogue could take a number of forms, including: enhanced focus on the nature and social implications of Internet technologies both in law school curricula and in professional continuing education; training seminars on legal and public policy issues for technologists involved in standard-setting processes; and liaison arrangements institutionalizing opportunities for two-way consultation between the judiciary and the technology community on issues of mutual concern. These efforts could be fostered and facilitated by a range of international actors (independently or in collaboration), including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the International Law Commission and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

Internet Governance from the Bench – the need for greater dialogue between the legal community and technical standards bodies to improve and strengthen internet governance.

The U.N. telecoms agency has invited the world’s more than 2 billion Internet users to join a debate about the future of the Internet. The Geneva-based International Telecommunications Union’s announcement Wednesday follows criticism from civil society groups who say preparations for an upcoming global conference have been shrouded in secrecy. […]
ITU website for public debate: http://www.itu.int/en/wcit-12/Pages/public.aspx

The U.N. telecoms agency has invited the world’s more than 2 billion Internet users to join a debate about the future of the Internet. The Geneva-based International Telecommunications Union’s announcement Wednesday follows criticism from civil society groups who say preparations for an upcoming global conference have been shrouded in secrecy. […]
ITU website for public debate: http://www.itu.int/en/wcit-12/Pages/public.aspx

Rather calling for an “internationalization” of DNS and root server management, we should use a functional approach that first asks what exactly the function of the regime needs to be (ensuring Internet integrity, stability and functionality in a process coherenent with (and outputs consoncant with) the Internet’s core values, including the protection of human rights). How this functional approach can be applied to Internet Governance, is a topic that I’m broaching in my book The Future of Indivdiuals in International Law. Lessons from International Internet Law, which will be published later this year

Rather calling for an “internationalization” of DNS and root server management, we should use a functional approach that first asks what exactly the function of the regime needs to be (ensuring Internet integrity, stability and functionality in a process coherenent with (and outputs consoncant with) the Internet’s core values, including the protection of human rights). How this functional approach can be applied to Internet Governance, is a topic that I’m broaching in my book The Future of Indivdiuals in International Law. Lessons from International Internet Law, which will be published later this year