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Toronto hosts the principal media agglomeration in English‐speaking Canada and the third largest in North America after New York and Los Angeles (Davis, 2011). In this agglomeration are found most of anglophone Canada’s major screen production houses, public broadcasters, and many of its private broadcasters. Many Canadian book, magazine, music, and newspaper publishing headquarters are located in Toronto, as are four of the eight principal Canadian media conglomerates. The agglomeration includes the country’s largest concentration of independent screen content producers, specialty broadcasters, supporting institutions, and many suppliers of specialized services and inputs: sound recording studios, law firms, postproduction services, media marketing and publicity agencies, financial and insurance services, theatrical exhibitors, Internet publishing firms, technical service suppliers, advertising agencies, below‐the‐line crews and their craft unions, and public and private post‐secondary educational programs. Tens of thousands of media microenterprises are present in the GTA (Davis, 2010). All three levels of media policy and program agencies are strongly represented in the city. Altogether the content layer of the Toronto media cluster (including film and television production, book, magazine, music, and interactive media) employed around 40,000 people and generated about $4.5B in revenues in 2007 (Davis, 2011).

Extract from an analysis of the “cognitive-cultural economy” of Toronto.
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Toronto hosts the principal media agglomeration in English‐speaking Canada and the third largest in North America after New York and Los Angeles (Davis, 2011). In this agglomeration are found most of anglophone Canada’s major screen production houses, public broadcasters, and many of its private broadcasters. Many Canadian book, magazine, music, and newspaper publishing headquarters are located in Toronto, as are four of the eight principal Canadian media conglomerates. The agglomeration includes the country’s largest concentration of independent screen content producers, specialty broadcasters, supporting institutions, and many suppliers of specialized services and inputs: sound recording studios, law firms, postproduction services, media marketing and publicity agencies, financial and insurance services, theatrical exhibitors, Internet publishing firms, technical service suppliers, advertising agencies, below‐the‐line crews and their craft unions, and public and private post‐secondary educational programs. Tens of thousands of media microenterprises are present in the GTA (Davis, 2010). All three levels of media policy and program agencies are strongly represented in the city. Altogether the content layer of the Toronto media cluster (including film and television production, book, magazine, music, and interactive media) employed around 40,000 people and generated about $4.5B in revenues in 2007 (Davis, 2011).

Extract from an analysis of the “cognitive-cultural economy” of Toronto.

The High-Risk Jobs Behind Your Digital Conveniences

thenextweb:

Whenever we post an update to our favourite social network, whenever we fire off a text message across the miles, whenever we download an app in a matter of seconds, there are people who’ve made it possible that we rarely (if ever) think about. These people are the ones who go to great lengths to keep our digital life as seamless and convenient as possible. And these great lengths are often just as dangerous as they are great.

Includes a look at online content moderators.

The High-Risk Jobs Behind Your Digital Conveniences