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Mr Javid said: “If we receive a majority at the next election, a Conservative government will scrap Labour’s Human Rights Act and deliver a new British Bill of Rights and Responsibilities. Passed in our Parliament and rooted in our values, it will restore British judges as the ultimate arbiters of British justice. "And today I’m delighted to announce that I have agreed with the Justice Secretary that the British Bill of Rights will include specific protection for journalists and a free press. "The Human Rights Act and the European courts have not done enough to protect journalists who play such a unique role in our society. Our British Bill of Rights will change that.” Mr Javid hailed the freedom of the press as “one of the fundamental liberties on which modern Britain was built”, and said that newspaper journalists were “the right people – the only people – to take the lead on developing and enforcing a new set of press standards”.

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Detekt is a free tool that scans your Windows computer for traces of FinFisher and Hacking Team RCS, commercial surveillance spyware that has been identified to be also used to target and monitor human rights defenders and journalists around the world.

This groundbreaking new book presents the most important examples of world-changing journalism, spanning one hundred years of history and every continent. Carefully curated by prominent international journalists working in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East, Global Muckraking includes Ken Saro-Wiwa’s defense of the Ogoni people in the Niger Delta; Horacio Verbitsky’s uncovering of the gruesome disappearance of political detainees in Argentina; Gareth Jones’s coverage of the Ukraine famine of 1932–33; missionary newspapers’ coverage of Chinese foot binding in the nineteenth century; Dwarkanath Ganguli’s exposé of the British “coolie” trade in nineteenth-century Assam, India; and many others.

Policy makers rely on high quality research to underpin evidence-based governance decisions. But just how this evidence is to be obtained – the research agenda of key concepts and questions, the quality or ethical requirements for methods, the challenges of implementation, evaluation and interpretation – all of this is rarely discussed publicly between researchers and research users. Such matters are particularly important in relation to children’s rights in a global, digital age, with a host of associated practical, ethical and political issues attached.

China, supported by South Africa and others, brought a hostile oral amendment to the resolution, to include a further paragraph warning of the dangers the Internet poses for encouraging terrorism, extremism, racism, and religious intolerance. This would have introduced to agreed UN language a loophole for online censorship antithetical to the purpose of the resolution and international standards. Fortunately it was voted down by a resounding 28 votes to 15, with 4 abstentions.[1] “We are alarmed that established democracies, such as South Africa and even India, distanced themselves from consensus by supporting China’s attempt to justify State censorship” Hughes said. “The fundamental importance of open, critical and even controversial expression on the Internet is a universal value that applies in all societies. Today the HRC ultimately rejected attempts to condition the enjoyment of human rights on the Internet on ‘duties and responsibilities’ of Internet users. That is an important win, which the HRC must continue to build upon.”