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This is when the Marconi Company decided it was not enough to have a 1kW transmitter each in Calcutta and Bombay. These transmitters were small and away from the government’s sight. If the government were to spend money on installing a stronger one in Delhi, its hands would thereafter be tied and it would not speak of shutting down the radio ever again.

So Marconi wheeled and dealed to get the government to install a 20kW transmitter in Delhi. They also went to Peshawar and installed a 10kW transmitter there at their own expense, telling the Frontier government that it was very important for its voice to reach the tribes and it could experiment with the transmitter for free; if the experiment worked, they could pay for it, otherwise Marconi would just take the transmitter back.

The central government was unsure which ministry to make responsible for radio. It fit neither into the Public Works Department nor into Irrigation. After much consideration, this hopeless and helpless department was handed over to the Post Office.

This groundbreaking new book presents the most important examples of world-changing journalism, spanning one hundred years of history and every continent. Carefully curated by prominent international journalists working in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East, Global Muckraking includes Ken Saro-Wiwa’s defense of the Ogoni people in the Niger Delta; Horacio Verbitsky’s uncovering of the gruesome disappearance of political detainees in Argentina; Gareth Jones’s coverage of the Ukraine famine of 1932–33; missionary newspapers’ coverage of Chinese foot binding in the nineteenth century; Dwarkanath Ganguli’s exposé of the British “coolie” trade in nineteenth-century Assam, India; and many others.

Most big ideas have loud critics. Not disruption. Disruptive innovation as the explanation for how change happens has been subject to little serious criticism, partly because it’s headlong, while critical inquiry is unhurried; partly because disrupters ridicule doubters by charging them with fogyism, as if to criticize a theory of change were identical to decrying change; and partly because, in its modern usage, innovation is the idea of progress jammed into a criticism-proof jack-in-the-box.

Dissecting “Disruptive Innovation” – Jill Lepore in The New Yorker.