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Tag Archives: hate speech

Broderick sees online participation split into two very different worlds. “There is a social realm where things are rationally sorted and then there’s the anonymous place that brings out a person’s base instincts. It can become a frothing, bubbling cauldron of insanity,” he said. “Yet, you need that animalistic part of yourself. I think of it almost like your sex drive.”
So with so much potential for offensive behavior, why allow commenting in the first place?
Both Isaf and Broderick believe that open and anonymous commenting is quite powerful when it works. Sometimes, even great ideas are born among the shouters. “We’ve seen comments where people spend a couple of hours researching and writing. I’ve watched a discussion on abortion that had 50 people taking part with 200 comments without a single attack,” Isaf said.

This article examines the tension between liberalism and Orthodoxy in Israel as it relates to censorship. The first section aims to explain Israel’s vulnerability as a multicultural democracy in a hostile region, with significant schisms that divide the nation. The next section presents the dilemma: should Israel employ legal mechanisms to counter hate speech and racism? The third section details the legal framework, while the fourth reviews recent cases in which political radicals were prosecuted for incitement to racism. The final section discusses cases in which football supporters were charged with incitement after chanting “Death to Arabs“ during matches. I argue that the state should consider the costs and risks of allowing hate speech and balance these against the costs and risks to democracy and free speech that are associated with censorship.

This article examines the tension between liberalism and Orthodoxy in Israel as it relates to censorship. The first section aims to explain Israel’s vulnerability as a multicultural democracy in a hostile region, with significant schisms that divide the nation. The next section presents the dilemma: should Israel employ legal mechanisms to counter hate speech and racism? The third section details the legal framework, while the fourth reviews recent cases in which political radicals were prosecuted for incitement to racism. The final section discusses cases in which football supporters were charged with incitement after chanting “Death to Arabs“ during matches. I argue that the state should consider the costs and risks of allowing hate speech and balance these against the costs and risks to democracy and free speech that are associated with censorship.

“The increase of extremist hate websites, the use of the Internet and social media by extremist groups and individuals to propagate hate speech and incite racial violence, and the increased number of incidents of racist violence and crimes prompted by racist content on the Internet remain to be address, despite the adoption of positive measures,” the human rights expert said.

The Special Rapporteur highlighted that combating racism on the Internet requires a comprehensive and cohesive approach developed through dialogue and consultation amongst different actors, including governments, civil society organisations, Internet service providers and the private sector in general.

In his view, States should adopt legislative measures and further examine the link between various manifestations of racism on the Internet and hate crimes committed. “Additional measures such as self- and co-regulatory initiatives developed by service providers and other relevant actors may also be useful in making efforts more effective,” Mr. Ruteere said. “I believe that a possible way of countering racism on the Internet is through content diversification, in particular by promoting local content,” the expert said, inviting States to adopt concrete policies and strategies to make the Internet widely accessible and affordable to all. “Education about racist content on the Internet and awareness raising measures are also important tools.

Mutuma Ruteere, UN Special Rapporteur on Racism, has delivered 2 reports on contemporary forms of racism – online and in extremist groups.

Here’s report 1, and here’s report 2.

“The increase of extremist hate websites, the use of the Internet and social media by extremist groups and individuals to propagate hate speech and incite racial violence, and the increased number of incidents of racist violence and crimes prompted by racist content on the Internet remain to be address, despite the adoption of positive measures,” the human rights expert said.

The Special Rapporteur highlighted that combating racism on the Internet requires a comprehensive and cohesive approach developed through dialogue and consultation amongst different actors, including governments, civil society organisations, Internet service providers and the private sector in general.

In his view, States should adopt legislative measures and further examine the link between various manifestations of racism on the Internet and hate crimes committed. “Additional measures such as self- and co-regulatory initiatives developed by service providers and other relevant actors may also be useful in making efforts more effective,” Mr. Ruteere said. “I believe that a possible way of countering racism on the Internet is through content diversification, in particular by promoting local content,” the expert said, inviting States to adopt concrete policies and strategies to make the Internet widely accessible and affordable to all. “Education about racist content on the Internet and awareness raising measures are also important tools.

Mutuma Ruteere, UN Special Rapporteur on Racism, has delivered 2 reports on contemporary forms of racism – online and in extremist groups.

Here’s report 1, and here’s report 2.