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Billed as an effort to break up Mexico’s notorious telecommunications and broadcast monopolies, the law covers a broad range of electronic communications issues [es] — and treads heavily in human rights territory. At the behest of the “competent” authorities, the law authorizes telecommunications companies to “block, inhibit, or eliminate” communications services “at critical moments for public and national security.” The law also authorizes Internet service providers to offer service packages that “respond to market demands” and differentiating in “capacity, speed, and quality” – a measure that could preclude protections for net neutrality in the country. To top it off, security measures in the law would allow authorities to track user activity in real time using geolocation tools, without obtaining prior court approval.

The right to freedom of expression and media freedom enable the free flow of information in order for the public to hold their governments to account. While the protection of national security can be a legitimate ground for restricting the right under international law, such restrictions are narrowly defined. Governments must show that a restriction is necessary to achieve a legitimate purpose and must be proportionate to the aim pursued. The presumption in favour of freedom of expression requires governments to demonstrate that the expression will actually harm national security; it is not sufficient to simply say that it will. National security should never be used to justify preventing disclosures of illegalities or wrongdoing, no matter how embarrassing such disclosures may be to the UK or other governments. In the case of Snowden and the Guardian, the disclosures have facilitated a much-needed public debate about mass surveillance in a democracy, and exposed the possible violation of the fundamental human rights of millions of people worldwide. As such, no liability should be incurred as the benefit to the public outweighs the demonstrable harm to national security.

Set to live blue grass music from Down Hill Strugglers, her all-female models presented her latest Fall 2013 creations.

One model presented a profusion of colour which included a lilac-fold coal coat worn over a leaf green shibon knit shirt and a black/grey/cream crystal pleated tartan skirt with a grey leather belt. Other conspicuous features of this creation included a blood orange slip and circle dress with a zero waste mobius accessory.

A blonde model sported a linden wool/mohair tie jacket/coat with leaf green shibori knit dirndl tie collar shirt with a purple/black mini-check pant.

The collection of techy 21st century fabrics and vintage pindots in wool, pinchecks in cotton and pinstripes in nylon was locally produced and presented at just across the street from her showroom to ensure “sustainability, small carbon footprints and zero waste”.

In an interview with Bernama, Yeohlee said the underlying theme for her latest creations was freedom of expression. “I have emphasised comfort and ease in my latest creations. My clothes are uninhibited by the notion of time or seasons, they can be used in any season anywhere in the world,” she said.

Malaysian fashion designer Yeohlee Teng finds inspiration for her Fall 2013 collection in Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech. Perhaps an under-utilised medium for media policy advocates?

Set to live blue grass music from Down Hill Strugglers, her all-female models presented her latest Fall 2013 creations.

One model presented a profusion of colour which included a lilac-fold coal coat worn over a leaf green shibon knit shirt and a black/grey/cream crystal pleated tartan skirt with a grey leather belt. Other conspicuous features of this creation included a blood orange slip and circle dress with a zero waste mobius accessory.

A blonde model sported a linden wool/mohair tie jacket/coat with leaf green shibori knit dirndl tie collar shirt with a purple/black mini-check pant.

The collection of techy 21st century fabrics and vintage pindots in wool, pinchecks in cotton and pinstripes in nylon was locally produced and presented at just across the street from her showroom to ensure “sustainability, small carbon footprints and zero waste”.

In an interview with Bernama, Yeohlee said the underlying theme for her latest creations was freedom of expression. “I have emphasised comfort and ease in my latest creations. My clothes are uninhibited by the notion of time or seasons, they can be used in any season anywhere in the world,” she said.

Malaysian fashion designer Yeohlee Teng finds inspiration for her Fall 2013 collection in Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech. Perhaps an under-utilised medium for media policy advocates?

In the Liberty you provided answers to those who hate free speech. Your main explanation was bracingly utilitarian, as befitted the son of James Mill. We value free speech, you wrote, because human beings are fallible and forgetful. Our ideas must be tested by argument: wrong opinion must be exposed and truth forced to defend itself, lest it “be held as a dead dogma, not a living truth.” (Your consequentialist followers said a flourishing marketplace of ideas was a precondition of participatory democracy and even of an innovative economy.)

Free Speech in the Era of Its Technological Amplification | MIT Technology Review

Jason Pontin writes a letter to John Stuart Mill on the current challenges of free speech in the context of Google, Facebook and Twitter.