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The Current is 10 attempts at alternative journalistic modes of communication, and 10 never before seen explorations of the news media. A creative supplement in the media landscape. It is entirely free and widely accessible. Based on the idea that our world view originates from our often abstract emotional life, rather than from our rational thoughts, it is our mission to add to news media an extra dimension across the spoken and written word – doing so via creative and artistic cinematic solutions.

The last season of The Wire drew particular attention from journalists given its setting at a fictional version of the Baltimore Sun, where show creator David Simon once worked. The concept of paradigm repair was used here to explain journalists’ responses to The Wire. Our qualitative analysis of articles from 44 newspapers, as well as radio transcripts, dealing with the 2008 season shows that a fictional challenge can precipitate vigorous efforts by journalists to restore their reputation after what they regard as an attack on their professional identity and credibility. The [real] Baltimore Sun and other papers where Simon’s journalistic nemeses worked were the most likely to call Simon vindictive and obsessed and to use this to marginalize his stinging critique of corporatized newsrooms.

How did journalists respond to the last season of The Wire – focused partly on journalism newsrooms? New research from the University of Maryland/Rhodes University:

The Wire and repair of the journalistic paradigm

The last season of The Wire drew particular attention from journalists given its setting at a fictional version of the Baltimore Sun, where show creator David Simon once worked. The concept of paradigm repair was used here to explain journalists’ responses to The Wire. Our qualitative analysis of articles from 44 newspapers, as well as radio transcripts, dealing with the 2008 season shows that a fictional challenge can precipitate vigorous efforts by journalists to restore their reputation after what they regard as an attack on their professional identity and credibility. The [real] Baltimore Sun and other papers where Simon’s journalistic nemeses worked were the most likely to call Simon vindictive and obsessed and to use this to marginalize his stinging critique of corporatized newsrooms.

How did journalists respond to the last season of The Wire – focused partly on journalism newsrooms? New research from the University of Maryland/Rhodes University:

The Wire and repair of the journalistic paradigm

This work examines the image of the female broadcast journalist in two series of novels by journalists Sparkle Hayter and Kelly Lange. Using their main protagonists Robin Hudson and Maxi Poole as guides, this paper analyzes and compares their image of the female broadcast journalist in the 21st century. Because images of journalists in fiction have an immense influence on how the public perceives real-life journalists, it is important to examine the fictional characters, how they function within in a predominately male profession; their relationships with men, journalistic ethics, and the popularity they possess throughout their careers. A larger picture of female broadcast journalists in today’s society should then emerge.

This work examines the image of the female broadcast journalist in two series of novels by journalists Sparkle Hayter and Kelly Lange. Using their main protagonists Robin Hudson and Maxi Poole as guides, this paper analyzes and compares their image of the female broadcast journalist in the 21st century. Because images of journalists in fiction have an immense influence on how the public perceives real-life journalists, it is important to examine the fictional characters, how they function within in a predominately male profession; their relationships with men, journalistic ethics, and the popularity they possess throughout their careers. A larger picture of female broadcast journalists in today’s society should then emerge.