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There are times when a good monarchy is better than a bad democracy,” said Sonmez, who works at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology’s Kaust Venture Lab Accelerator. “The expectation was that Turkey would move toward EU accession, and we’d have more freedom after the military was put down. But now we see that’s not happening.

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How can policy-making be made more timely and participatory? How can policy-modelling make better use of ICTs and data? Questions pertinent to the media policy community all over the world… Well, the EU’s Crossover project set out to answer these and related questions, and on 17th and 18th June, they’re holding their final project conference in Dublin to discuss their findings. (You can sign up to attend here.)

Crossover is in the final weeks of developing its research roadmap on policy-making 2.0 – you can comment and contribute here (until June 10th). The final roadmap will be presented at the Dublin conference, alongside various EU initiatives pushing on practical applications in this area – in immigration policy, youth participation in policy-making, and the FuturICT Living Earth Platform.   

You can explore the data from Crossover’s research on their platform here. We’re keen to see how lessons from Crossover can be (or already are being) applied by policy-makers and policy-influencers in the media, communications and internet space – let us know your thoughts by commenting below, or tweeting us

In this system, the EU’s role – defending the European values of media freedom and pluralism – is further justified by the need to protect its own representative democracy. After all, free and democratic European parliamentary elections could be called into question if some of the member states in which they are held lack media freedom and pluralism.

The fact that the group’s recommendations do not align with much of the media’s reporting on them suggests either that the group’s report overstates its intentions, or that the reading of some media outlets has been skewed. Reports that the group’s recommendations would empower the EU to protect media freedom, not to regulate the media – and even criticism that the recommendations leave too much to national authorities – support the latter interpretation. They also raise questions about why some in the media read so much EU control into the report; maybe the fact that it was an EU report meant more than its content.

In this system, the EU’s role – defending the European values of media freedom and pluralism – is further justified by the need to protect its own representative democracy. After all, free and democratic European parliamentary elections could be called into question if some of the member states in which they are held lack media freedom and pluralism.

The fact that the group’s recommendations do not align with much of the media’s reporting on them suggests either that the group’s report overstates its intentions, or that the reading of some media outlets has been skewed. Reports that the group’s recommendations would empower the EU to protect media freedom, not to regulate the media – and even criticism that the recommendations leave too much to national authorities – support the latter interpretation. They also raise questions about why some in the media read so much EU control into the report; maybe the fact that it was an EU report meant more than its content.

Jagland’s visit shows just how critical role the Council of Europe system is playing in Turkey in terms of democracy and freedom of expression, a system of which the ECHR is also a very significant part. No matter how much vagueness lies ahead amid the constant turbulence of Turkey’s relations with the European Union, institutional cooperation with the Council of Europe continues to progress on a steady basis on its own track without being affected by these zigzags on the EU front.We need to accept that the Council of Europe is the most important Western institution today in terms of the capacity to affect and steer goals related to democracy, the rule of law and human rights in Turkey. Consequently, the strengthening of Turkey’s engagement with the Council of Europe has vital significance in terms of these targets.