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Toronto hosts the principal media agglomeration in English‐speaking Canada and the third largest in North America after New York and Los Angeles (Davis, 2011). In this agglomeration are found most of anglophone Canada’s major screen production houses, public broadcasters, and many of its private broadcasters. Many Canadian book, magazine, music, and newspaper publishing headquarters are located in Toronto, as are four of the eight principal Canadian media conglomerates. The agglomeration includes the country’s largest concentration of independent screen content producers, specialty broadcasters, supporting institutions, and many suppliers of specialized services and inputs: sound recording studios, law firms, postproduction services, media marketing and publicity agencies, financial and insurance services, theatrical exhibitors, Internet publishing firms, technical service suppliers, advertising agencies, below‐the‐line crews and their craft unions, and public and private post‐secondary educational programs. Tens of thousands of media microenterprises are present in the GTA (Davis, 2010). All three levels of media policy and program agencies are strongly represented in the city. Altogether the content layer of the Toronto media cluster (including film and television production, book, magazine, music, and interactive media) employed around 40,000 people and generated about $4.5B in revenues in 2007 (Davis, 2011).

Extract from an analysis of the “cognitive-cultural economy” of Toronto.

Journalism, like other professions, has direct impact on the citizenry and the society at large. Practitioners are expected to be guided by a code of conduct which members are expected to comply with strictly, and to be enforced by a body acceptable to all the stakeholders. However, journalism practice in Nigeria has raised a lot of questions as to the proprietary of referring to it as a profession. The loose definition of the criteria for membership has made the profession an all-comers-affair. Also, the absence of a prescribed qualifying test has made it difficult to moderate the standard of journalism practice in Nigeria. To restore credibility to the profession, the gap between school curricula and journalism practice must be bridged. A revisit to the existing code of conduct to explicitly state those who can practice journalism in Nigeria is necessary. Also, an acceptable remuneration package comparable with other professions must be worked out.

New paper on Nigerian Journalism and Professionalism, by Tokunbo Alex Adaja.

Journalism, like other professions, has direct impact on the citizenry and the society at large. Practitioners are expected to be guided by a code of conduct which members are expected to comply with strictly, and to be enforced by a body acceptable to all the stakeholders. However, journalism practice in Nigeria has raised a lot of questions as to the proprietary of referring to it as a profession. The loose definition of the criteria for membership has made the profession an all-comers-affair. Also, the absence of a prescribed qualifying test has made it difficult to moderate the standard of journalism practice in Nigeria. To restore credibility to the profession, the gap between school curricula and journalism practice must be bridged. A revisit to the existing code of conduct to explicitly state those who can practice journalism in Nigeria is necessary. Also, an acceptable remuneration package comparable with other professions must be worked out.

New paper on Nigerian Journalism and Professionalism, by Tokunbo Alex Adaja.

The announcement that the La Nación newspaper of Chile is closing down has drawn the attention of journalists, analysts and opposition lawmakers to the heavy concentration of press ownership, now in the hands of only two business groups, and to the lack of regulations to ensure media pluralism.
“The state must create public media in areas (press, radio or television) where there is a high concentration of ownership,” said Marcelo Castillo, head of the Chilean Association of Journalists.
Furthermore, “public communication policies are needed that go beyond the mere existence of media,” he said.
At present, the only state electronic media outlet is National Television of Chile, an autonomous company with a seven-member board nominated by the president and ratified by the Senate.

The announcement that the La Nación newspaper of Chile is closing down has drawn the attention of journalists, analysts and opposition lawmakers to the heavy concentration of press ownership, now in the hands of only two business groups, and to the lack of regulations to ensure media pluralism.
“The state must create public media in areas (press, radio or television) where there is a high concentration of ownership,” said Marcelo Castillo, head of the Chilean Association of Journalists.
Furthermore, “public communication policies are needed that go beyond the mere existence of media,” he said.
At present, the only state electronic media outlet is National Television of Chile, an autonomous company with a seven-member board nominated by the president and ratified by the Senate.