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“Authors: Mark Lochrie, Paul Egglestone, Matjaž Kljun, Klen Čopič Pucihar
Abstract: This paper presents a concept of using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) commonly known as a ‘drone’ as a means to deliver and facilitate game play. Our idea is to project a playing area and follow users in the game with a support of drone. This introduces novel abilities (i) to move the gaming platform to the desired location and (ii) to free users from carrying the gaming equipment. Consequently this intigates novel possibilities to explore and study new exergame paradigms and users’ attitudes towards the system as a whole. The concept has also a potential to provide a breakthrough in social acceptance of drones in gaming scenarios whilst contributing to current debates on the legislation governing drone flights and furthering knowledge in human-drone interaction.

(via Media Innovation Studio – A Moving Projector Platform for Projected Street Games)

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), commonly known as “drones,” are a military technology now being developed for civilian and commercial use in the United States. With the federal government moving to develop rules for these uses in U.S. airspace by 2015, technologists, researchers, and news organizations are considering application of drone technology for reporting and data gathering. UAVs offer an inexpensive way to put cameras and sensors in the air to capture images and data but also pose serious concerns about safety, privacy, conflict of interest, perspective, and credibility. This research examines the early ethical considerations among drone journalism developers and digital information activists. It places those considerations against the backdrop of utilitarian ethical theory applied to journalism to suggest additional layers of reasoning that must be applied to drones in reporting. Finally, it suggests articulation of ethical guidelines and transparency with the public as means to address inevitable adverse effects of use of this technology.

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are a technology now impacting on many fields, including journalism and mass communication. Also referred to as drones, these small remotely-guided aircraft have gained prominence through their increased use in the hunt for Al Qaeda leaders in Afghanistan and Pakistan. With increasingly sophisticated navigation systems and dramatically decreased costs, drones are now being purchased and put to use by commercial organizations and private citizens. Traditional journalists and citizen journalists alike are using drones to obtain aerial footage in a variety of locations around the world. The implications for the field of journalism and mass communication are numerous, with practical, theoretical and ethical dimensions. This paper explores these dimensions using an inductive, qualitative approach. This research paper offers a brief history of UAVs, the results of our canvass of cases that could be categorized as drone journalism, the themes that emerge from this case analysis, and an in-depth look at how this technology impacts on journalism and mass communication. Where this new technology fits within surveillance scholarship is also considered.

Eyewitness reporting, particularly on warfare, environmental disasters, and other dramatic news events, might involve considerable journalistic risk taking. This study investigates in what ways the innovation of drones for journalistic purposes might extend and improve the use of eyewitness accounts, especially in areas or fields where human coverage would be impossible or too dangerous. It examines the interrelationships among new technologies, journalistic innovation, and the audience’s quest for constant visual enforcements, drawing on diffusion theory and social constructivist models for process innovation. It argues that the emergent genre of drone journalism might come to exemplify a “disruptive innovation,” an innovation that has emerged accidentally, but disrupts existing conceptions of visual journalism, and subsequently contributes to the creation of new markets and value networks.

The world is constantly changing and I feel like my job is to try to see how it is changing,” he says. “Traditionally images have functioned as representations of something in the world, but we are quickly approaching the point where vast majority of images are produced for other machines and no human being will ever see them. It’s an operational regime of images.