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For decades Kuwait, with its rowdy elected parliament and noisy press, has enjoyed relative freedom. Faced in recent months by unprecedented mass demonstrations demanding broader democracy, the sleekly rich city-state’s riot police have gained a nasty reputation for brutality.

Thus spake The Economist a few weeks ago, just prior to a session organised by the UK Embassy in Kuwait to “focus on finding the right balance between ensuring freedom of expression and security in the context of the rising popularity of social media.” It was vigorously tweeted at #q8_expression, and a couple of accounts of the meeting have appeared online.

For decades Kuwait, with its rowdy elected parliament and noisy press, has enjoyed relative freedom. Faced in recent months by unprecedented mass demonstrations demanding broader democracy, the sleekly rich city-state’s riot police have gained a nasty reputation for brutality.

Thus spake The Economist a few weeks ago, just prior to a session organised by the UK Embassy in Kuwait to “focus on finding the right balance between ensuring freedom of expression and security in the context of the rising popularity of social media.” It was vigorously tweeted at #q8_expression, and a couple of accounts of the meeting have appeared online.

The Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) was established in 2000. It is a multilateral platform for exchange and cooperation between China and African countries that have formal diplomatic relationships with China, and covers various aspects of politics, trade, economy, society and culture.
There have been four FOCAC ministerial conferences to date, the third coinciding with the China-Africa Summit. FOCAC ministerial conferences are held every three years, and alternate between China and an African country.
The fifth ministerial conference took place on 19–20 July 2012 in Beijing. All previous FOCAC ministerial conferences and their follow-up actions have had a great impact and deepened bilateral cooperation between China and Africa.
This report assesses the success of FOCAC in fulfilling commitments made at previous ministerial meetings, and the challenges and opportunities for institutionalizing FOCAC as a platform for promoting China-Africa relations in coming decades.

FOCAC twelve years later: achievements, challenges and the way forward | SAFPI

Some good detail in here on the history of exchanges between China and African countries.

The Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) was established in 2000. It is a multilateral platform for exchange and cooperation between China and African countries that have formal diplomatic relationships with China, and covers various aspects of politics, trade, economy, society and culture.
There have been four FOCAC ministerial conferences to date, the third coinciding with the China-Africa Summit. FOCAC ministerial conferences are held every three years, and alternate between China and an African country.
The fifth ministerial conference took place on 19–20 July 2012 in Beijing. All previous FOCAC ministerial conferences and their follow-up actions have had a great impact and deepened bilateral cooperation between China and Africa.
This report assesses the success of FOCAC in fulfilling commitments made at previous ministerial meetings, and the challenges and opportunities for institutionalizing FOCAC as a platform for promoting China-Africa relations in coming decades.

FOCAC twelve years later: achievements, challenges and the way forward | SAFPI

Some good detail in here on the history of exchanges between China and African countries.

Russian media write very little about Africa, what is going on there, what are the social and political dynamics in different parts of the continent. Media and NGOs should make big efforts to increase level of mutual knowledge, which can stimulate interest for each other and lead to increased economic interaction as well,” said Fyodor Lukyanov, editor-in-chief of the journal Russia in Global Affairs. “To certain extent,” Lukyanov said, “the intensification of non-political contacts may contribute to increased interest. But in Russia’s case, the main drivers of any cooperation are more traditional rather than political interests of the state and economic interest of big companies. Soft power has never been a strong side of Russian policy in the post-Soviet era.

Promoting Russia’s culture in Africa | Russia Beyond The Headlines – Russia worrying about losing further ground to Brzail, India and China in African relations…