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Right now in Zagreb, researchers, journalists and policy-makers from Croatia and beyond are meeting to discuss Digital Freedom of Expression, and the challenges faced by public media services and non-profit media. (Agenda in Word / PDF.)

Here’s the video message Rebecca Mackinnon sent to conference participants, as she couldn’t be there in person. In it, she urges the news media and journalists to place internet freedom on a par with press freedom – without a free and open internet, she argues, press freedom will face ever more severe threats.

(via Video: Rebecca Mackinnon on press freedom and internet freedom | Media Policy)

Right now in Zagreb, researchers, journalists and policy-makers from Croatia and beyond are meeting to discuss Digital Freedom of Expression, and the challenges faced by public media services and non-profit media. (Agenda in Word / PDF.)

Here’s the video message Rebecca Mackinnon sent to conference participants, as she couldn’t be there in person. In it, she urges the news media and journalists to place internet freedom on a par with press freedom – without a free and open internet, she argues, press freedom will face ever more severe threats.

(via Video: Rebecca Mackinnon on press freedom and internet freedom | Media Policy)

In Zagreb, researchers, journalists and policy-makers from Croatia and beyond have been meeting on October 4th and 5th to discuss Digital Freedom of Expression, and the challenges faced by public media services and non-profit media. (Here’s the conference agenda in Word and as a PDF.) OSF’s own recent Mapping Digital Media report for Croatia covers many of these issues, and you can read it here.

 

Since she couldn’t be in Zagreb in person, Rebecca Mackinnon – co-founder of Global Voices Online, former CNN correspondent, scholar and author – recorded a video message to conference participants, but we think it deserves a wider airing. In it, she urges the news media and journalists to place internet freedom on a par with press freedom – without a free and open internet, she argues, press freedom will face ever more severe threats.

 

 

The aim of this paper is to systematize existing research on media reporting related to various aspects of citizenship, and to contribute with a primary analysis of media content, in order to define how the leading print media in four states (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro, and Serbia) reported on these issues. After establishing the profile of each state, this paper provides a profile of the analysed media, followed by a short summary of how these media reported on selected citizenship-related issues and topics. The main trends in media reporting were analysed within an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that includes the selected approaches / theories in media and communication studies, but also the studies on citizenship. The main assumption is that the mass media in the states under scrutiny, while reporting on citizenship-related issues, have mostly legitimized governments in determining their citizenship policies. Only in Montenegro and, to some extent, in Croatia, when it comes to external voting, have oppositional media outlets continuously criticized the “official” citizenship policies, while in other states the leading media discourses lack a polemical and critical stance towards citizenship-related issues.

The aim of this paper is to systematize existing research on media reporting related to various aspects of citizenship, and to contribute with a primary analysis of media content, in order to define how the leading print media in four states (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro, and Serbia) reported on these issues. After establishing the profile of each state, this paper provides a profile of the analysed media, followed by a short summary of how these media reported on selected citizenship-related issues and topics. The main trends in media reporting were analysed within an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that includes the selected approaches / theories in media and communication studies, but also the studies on citizenship. The main assumption is that the mass media in the states under scrutiny, while reporting on citizenship-related issues, have mostly legitimized governments in determining their citizenship policies. Only in Montenegro and, to some extent, in Croatia, when it comes to external voting, have oppositional media outlets continuously criticized the “official” citizenship policies, while in other states the leading media discourses lack a polemical and critical stance towards citizenship-related issues.