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“How to Survive a Shooting” chronicled Stingley’s story: coping with the loss of her daughter, being a loving mother to her two sons, and becoming an anti-violence activist in the face of apparent apathy. In a sense, it was a dismayingly familiar narrative—in a city plagued by violence, we’ve heard similar tales before. But Holliday and Rodriguez sought to bring the story to life through their choice of format: “comics journalism,” the shorthand term for reported nonfiction told through sequential art.

They nailed it. Stingley’s words, rendered alongside Rodriguez’s illustrations, are heartbreaking in a way few written articles or even videos achieve; a panel about her being woken from a dream about her slain daughter by the barking of the family dog is indelible. The piece received tons of attention, and eventually snagged a national award from the Association of Alternative Newsmedia in the category, “Outside-the-Box: Innovation/Format Buster.”

“I’ve written a whole lot of crime stories, you know. People would usually give it like 20 seconds to scan it,” Holliday says. “But package it up with the comics, and it’s like you’ve never heard it before. The same people will read the story all the way to the end. It can become that bridge.”

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Viridiana Rios and Michele Coscia have created an algorithm they call MOGO (Making Order Using Google As an Oracle) which processes Google data to track cartel activity. “MOGO does the jobs we could never do,” Rios told me in a phone interview today. “It reads all of the newspapers that have ever been published in the last 20 years and extracts information about whether and when a particular cartel is mentioned and where that cartel is mentioned. We get the organization, the municipality in which it is supposedly operating, and the year in which the note was published.

Viridiana Rios and Michele Coscia have created an algorithm they call MOGO (Making Order Using Google As an Oracle) which processes Google data to track cartel activity. “MOGO does the jobs we could never do,” Rios told me in a phone interview today. “It reads all of the newspapers that have ever been published in the last 20 years and extracts information about whether and when a particular cartel is mentioned and where that cartel is mentioned. We get the organization, the municipality in which it is supposedly operating, and the year in which the note was published.”

The public consultation on the guidelines has been a very useful exercise. The purpose of the guidelines is to strike the right balance between the important public interest in a free press and the need to prosecute serious wrongdoing. That’s not an easy exercise, but I’m pleased that the overwhelming majority of responses supported the approach taken in the guidelines, in particular the requirement that prosecutors consider whether the public interest served by the journalistic conduct in question outweighs the overall criminality before bringing criminal proceedings. […] These guidelines will ensure a consistent approach by prosecutors while, at the same time, providing transparency as to the approach the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) will take when considering these important and often finely balanced cases. […] During the consultation period I have held meetings with the Press Complaints Commission, Ofcom and the Information Commissioner’s Office in an attempt to build consensus around the guidelines. I’m pleased to report that Lord Hunt, Ed Richards and Christopher Graham all support the guidelines.