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Misbehaviour and malpractices of Chinese journalists in recent years have brought media corruption under the spotlight. The lack of professionalism and scarcity of fully established ethics in media organisations have made the case worse. However, while Chinese media and academics concentrate narrowly on paid-for news or gag fee by prompting the enforcement of disciplinary restraints and ‘thought education’, this hot issue has been largely ignored by western scholars and has only been occasionally reported by some western media. Based mainly on prominent cases and document studies, this article classifies three major types of media corruption in the Chinese context: (1) individual red-envelope taking, (2) institutional profit seeking and (3) personal businesses benefiting from the identity of a reporter. It then explores two major endogenous causes of media corruption: media’s unique role in China’s political power structure and their monopoly in information collection and delivery. Two current countermeasures undertaken against this phenomenon in China are finally analysed.

Media Corruption: A Chinesee Characteristic – article by Ren Li in Journal of Business Ethics

Misbehaviour and malpractices of Chinese journalists in recent years have brought media corruption under the spotlight. The lack of professionalism and scarcity of fully established ethics in media organisations have made the case worse. However, while Chinese media and academics concentrate narrowly on paid-for news or gag fee by prompting the enforcement of disciplinary restraints and ‘thought education’, this hot issue has been largely ignored by western scholars and has only been occasionally reported by some western media. Based mainly on prominent cases and document studies, this article classifies three major types of media corruption in the Chinese context: (1) individual red-envelope taking, (2) institutional profit seeking and (3) personal businesses benefiting from the identity of a reporter. It then explores two major endogenous causes of media corruption: media’s unique role in China’s political power structure and their monopoly in information collection and delivery. Two current countermeasures undertaken against this phenomenon in China are finally analysed.

Media Corruption: A Chinesee Characteristic – article by Ren Li in Journal of Business Ethics

Spassov, who has been investigating a controversial development project in the Black Sea resort city of Varna, received a parcel on July 31st containing a copy “The Art of War,” with a dedication signed by Marin Mitev, a co-owner of TIM Holding, a powerful economic group associated with the project. “If you cannot make friends or win them, it is better to leave them alone,” the dedication read, adding in post scriptum that “The world is small and it cannot be governed from Singapore.” The first part was viewed an apparent threat to Spassov himself, while the second referred to the publishers of Dnevnik and Capital.

Spassov, who has been investigating a controversial development project in the Black Sea resort city of Varna, received a parcel on July 31st containing a copy “The Art of War,” with a dedication signed by Marin Mitev, a co-owner of TIM Holding, a powerful economic group associated with the project. “If you cannot make friends or win them, it is better to leave them alone,” the dedication read, adding in post scriptum that “The world is small and it cannot be governed from Singapore.” The first part was viewed an apparent threat to Spassov himself, while the second referred to the publishers of Dnevnik and Capital.

[Originally published here on the WITNESS Hub Blog.]

How does ballot-stealing in Zimbabwe work? British newspaper the Guardian smuggled a camera to a Zimbabwean prison officer in the run-up to the recent election run-off in Zimbabwe to find out.

Shepherd Yuda records secretly as he and his colleagues are forced to vote for Robert Mugabe as one of his lieutenants watches.

Yuda puts it starkly:

This country has become a boiling pot where only stones can survive.

Read more:
Zimbabwe resources from Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch.
Kubatana has extensive resources on Zimbabwe here.

Take action with Avaaz now.

NB – The Guardian does not currently permit embeds of its videos, so we have illustrated this post with Al Jazeera’s use of the footage. If you would like to see the original Guardian piece, click here. More from the Guardian here and here.