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Tag Archives: corruption

In the past, few Indians bothered to initiate defamation suits, because trials can take decades in the country’s overburdened courts. A handful of plaintiffs have been awarded paltry sums after waiting years for their cases to be resolved. But in a rare case last year, a lower court in the city of Pune ordered a private news television channel to pay a retired judge damages amounting to about $18 million for mistakenly showing his photograph during a story about a judge with a similar name who had been accused of fraud. The channel, which apologized and corrected the mistake on air, has appealed.

The public consultation on the guidelines has been a very useful exercise. The purpose of the guidelines is to strike the right balance between the important public interest in a free press and the need to prosecute serious wrongdoing. That’s not an easy exercise, but I’m pleased that the overwhelming majority of responses supported the approach taken in the guidelines, in particular the requirement that prosecutors consider whether the public interest served by the journalistic conduct in question outweighs the overall criminality before bringing criminal proceedings. […] These guidelines will ensure a consistent approach by prosecutors while, at the same time, providing transparency as to the approach the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) will take when considering these important and often finely balanced cases. […] During the consultation period I have held meetings with the Press Complaints Commission, Ofcom and the Information Commissioner’s Office in an attempt to build consensus around the guidelines. I’m pleased to report that Lord Hunt, Ed Richards and Christopher Graham all support the guidelines.

The public consultation on the guidelines has been a very useful exercise. The purpose of the guidelines is to strike the right balance between the important public interest in a free press and the need to prosecute serious wrongdoing. That’s not an easy exercise, but I’m pleased that the overwhelming majority of responses supported the approach taken in the guidelines, in particular the requirement that prosecutors consider whether the public interest served by the journalistic conduct in question outweighs the overall criminality before bringing criminal proceedings. […] These guidelines will ensure a consistent approach by prosecutors while, at the same time, providing transparency as to the approach the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) will take when considering these important and often finely balanced cases. […] During the consultation period I have held meetings with the Press Complaints Commission, Ofcom and the Information Commissioner’s Office in an attempt to build consensus around the guidelines. I’m pleased to report that Lord Hunt, Ed Richards and Christopher Graham all support the guidelines.

Mr Ampratwum said the research revealed that a solid majority of Ghanaians supported media exposure of government mistakes and corruption with 55 per cent of them endorsing free media practice
But a large minority (43 per cent) endorse government control over the media practice, he added.

Commenting on this, Professor Audrey Gadzekpo, Member of the Board of Directors, CDD, Ghana, said it sounded ironical that in one breath Ghanaians supported and applauded the media for their efforts in exposing corruption and mistakes of government, but at the same time endorsed governmental control over the media. She said it could be that either the respondents did not have proper understanding of what the media was or that perhaps public confidence in the ability of the media to operate within their boundaries was on a decline.

Mr Ampratwum said the research revealed that a solid majority of Ghanaians supported media exposure of government mistakes and corruption with 55 per cent of them endorsing free media practice
But a large minority (43 per cent) endorse government control over the media practice, he added.

Commenting on this, Professor Audrey Gadzekpo, Member of the Board of Directors, CDD, Ghana, said it sounded ironical that in one breath Ghanaians supported and applauded the media for their efforts in exposing corruption and mistakes of government, but at the same time endorsed governmental control over the media. She said it could be that either the respondents did not have proper understanding of what the media was or that perhaps public confidence in the ability of the media to operate within their boundaries was on a decline.