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[From Executive Summary]

NGOs
Trust in NGOs remains high, with an overall 88 percent of countries surveyed over 50 percent (the highest is Mexico, an emerging market, at 83 percent; the lowest is Japan, a developed market, at 37 percent). The most notable change over time is in China, where only five years ago trust in NGOs was 48 percent; today it is 81 percent. Three of the top five countries with the highest trust in NGOs, like China, are emerging markets.

Media
Trust in media, at 57 percent globally, continues to improve with a five-point increase from 2012. Sixty-two percent of countries surveyed have a trust score of 50 percent or above, compared to 50 percent of countries surveyed in 2008. Trust is significantly higher in emerging countries than in developed countries (figure 3). Large gaps in trust also exist in how the general population view types of media, with emerging markets placing more trust in social by 32points, traditional by 14 points, online search engines by 24 points, hybrid by 24 points and owned by 22 points. Trust in media breaks down along generational lines, as well. Among all ages in the general population, trust in traditional media and online search engines is highest. But trust in the other three categories of media drops among older generations particularly (age 45+) to an average of 34.5 percent for hybrid, 34 percent for owned and 33 percent for social. Among the youngest generation (ages 18-29), trust is highest in online search engines (61 percent) and lowest in owned media (44 percent).

The Edelman Trust Barometer is out for 2013, and makes, as ever, interesting reading for those in civil society and the media.
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[From Executive Summary]

NGOs
Trust in NGOs remains high, with an overall 88 percent of countries surveyed over 50 percent (the highest is Mexico, an emerging market, at 83 percent; the lowest is Japan, a developed market, at 37 percent). The most notable change over time is in China, where only five years ago trust in NGOs was 48 percent; today it is 81 percent. Three of the top five countries with the highest trust in NGOs, like China, are emerging markets.

Media
Trust in media, at 57 percent globally, continues to improve with a five-point increase from 2012. Sixty-two percent of countries surveyed have a trust score of 50 percent or above, compared to 50 percent of countries surveyed in 2008. Trust is significantly higher in emerging countries than in developed countries (figure 3). Large gaps in trust also exist in how the general population view types of media, with emerging markets placing more trust in social by 32points, traditional by 14 points, online search engines by 24 points, hybrid by 24 points and owned by 22 points. Trust in media breaks down along generational lines, as well. Among all ages in the general population, trust in traditional media and online search engines is highest. But trust in the other three categories of media drops among older generations particularly (age 45+) to an average of 34.5 percent for hybrid, 34 percent for owned and 33 percent for social. Among the youngest generation (ages 18-29), trust is highest in online search engines (61 percent) and lowest in owned media (44 percent).

The Edelman Trust Barometer is out for 2013, and makes, as ever, interesting reading for those in civil society and the media.

This book is basically a Ph.D which aimed to study the media professionals’ awareness and perception about Pakistan’s media policy with specific focus on constitutional provision of the press freedom, sections of Pakistan Penal Code (PPC) pertaining to the press, press laws, Judiciary, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, professional organizations, Press Council, government-press relationship, working conditions, and public & private sectors broadcast media.The book concludes with the suggestions that keeping in view the growing competition in the field of media in Pakistan, there is a need that representative groups of civil society be given dominant representation on Board of Directors of Radio Pakistan and Pakistan Television to liberalize the policies of government controlled media. Also such representation should be given in Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority(PEMRA) to make it more free and professional friendly.

This book is basically a Ph.D which aimed to study the media professionals’ awareness and perception about Pakistan’s media policy with specific focus on constitutional provision of the press freedom, sections of Pakistan Penal Code (PPC) pertaining to the press, press laws, Judiciary, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, professional organizations, Press Council, government-press relationship, working conditions, and public & private sectors broadcast media.The book concludes with the suggestions that keeping in view the growing competition in the field of media in Pakistan, there is a need that representative groups of civil society be given dominant representation on Board of Directors of Radio Pakistan and Pakistan Television to liberalize the policies of government controlled media. Also such representation should be given in Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority(PEMRA) to make it more free and professional friendly.

I’m not a specialist in intellectual property, but I have had to gen up on IP rights in the digital domain over the last few years as part of my work first at Panos London, and then on the WITNESS Hub. Watching the creeping impact of IP restrictions and protections on human rights – principally on freedom of expression, but also extending into other rights – it’s been quite concerning there has not appeared to be a more international, cross-cutting and holistic effort from civil society to push back on corporate rights holders, and on legislators at the national and international level.

But then a few months ago came the mammoth and fascinating SSRC report on Media Piracy in Emerging Economies. And now comes the extremely impressive Washington Declaration on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest, which takes a wide view across the range of the impacts of this IP creep, and still manages to present a compelling and specific case for a more progressive IP regime. I urge you to read it

A few brief thoughts on the text from a non-specialist…

I was particularly heartened to see the centrality of human rights in the declaration and in the legal framework that should govern IP:

Use human rights, including civil and political and social and economic rights, to scrutinize expansions of intellectual property rights that threaten access to essential knowledge goods and services.

And likewise the importance of archives in the digital age (although it would have been interesting to see inclusion of human rights and justice-focused archives too):

Promote limitations and exceptions that enable libraries, museums, archives and other “institutions of memory” to fulfill their public interest missions, while assuring that cultural and educational institutions take advantage of existing flexibilities.

As well as the inclusion of a specific section advocating for “development agendas to infuse all levels of international and national intellectual property policy making” is critically important and long overdue.

I did note, however, the continued absence of something I’ve discussed with a few specialists working in this domain, and which comes up in the recent report I worked on with WITNESS, Cameras Everywhere, namely whether material that is directly related to human rights in particular might be given a special status within the definition of “public interest”. This section comes close, with its “socially valuable”:

Recognize the continued role of public funding for types of production deemed socially valuable and systematically under-provisioned by the market, such as small-market audiovisual, musical and artistic culture.

Notwithstanding that debate, the Washington Declaration stands as a hugely important step forward in building critical mass in civil society for more progressive IP regimes worldwide, and I’m fascinated to see what impact it has on policy-making and advocacy alike.

[Addition: here’s a post from the professor at AU who hosted the meeting at which the Declaration was formed. He urges you to sign it – I’m #657…]