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Toronto hosts the principal media agglomeration in English‐speaking Canada and the third largest in North America after New York and Los Angeles (Davis, 2011). In this agglomeration are found most of anglophone Canada’s major screen production houses, public broadcasters, and many of its private broadcasters. Many Canadian book, magazine, music, and newspaper publishing headquarters are located in Toronto, as are four of the eight principal Canadian media conglomerates. The agglomeration includes the country’s largest concentration of independent screen content producers, specialty broadcasters, supporting institutions, and many suppliers of specialized services and inputs: sound recording studios, law firms, postproduction services, media marketing and publicity agencies, financial and insurance services, theatrical exhibitors, Internet publishing firms, technical service suppliers, advertising agencies, below‐the‐line crews and their craft unions, and public and private post‐secondary educational programs. Tens of thousands of media microenterprises are present in the GTA (Davis, 2010). All three levels of media policy and program agencies are strongly represented in the city. Altogether the content layer of the Toronto media cluster (including film and television production, book, magazine, music, and interactive media) employed around 40,000 people and generated about $4.5B in revenues in 2007 (Davis, 2011).

Extract from an analysis of the “cognitive-cultural economy” of Toronto.
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Toronto hosts the principal media agglomeration in English‐speaking Canada and the third largest in North America after New York and Los Angeles (Davis, 2011). In this agglomeration are found most of anglophone Canada’s major screen production houses, public broadcasters, and many of its private broadcasters. Many Canadian book, magazine, music, and newspaper publishing headquarters are located in Toronto, as are four of the eight principal Canadian media conglomerates. The agglomeration includes the country’s largest concentration of independent screen content producers, specialty broadcasters, supporting institutions, and many suppliers of specialized services and inputs: sound recording studios, law firms, postproduction services, media marketing and publicity agencies, financial and insurance services, theatrical exhibitors, Internet publishing firms, technical service suppliers, advertising agencies, below‐the‐line crews and their craft unions, and public and private post‐secondary educational programs. Tens of thousands of media microenterprises are present in the GTA (Davis, 2010). All three levels of media policy and program agencies are strongly represented in the city. Altogether the content layer of the Toronto media cluster (including film and television production, book, magazine, music, and interactive media) employed around 40,000 people and generated about $4.5B in revenues in 2007 (Davis, 2011).

Extract from an analysis of the “cognitive-cultural economy” of Toronto.

The legal prosecution of Twitter users in the U.K. raises questions about the line between protecting free speech and limiting hate speech or libelous comments.Here in Canada, as the law currently stands, a person can only be prosecuted for something they’ve posted on social media if that posting is criminally libelous or incites hatred. If we wanted to amend legislation surrounding free speech, it would not happen quickly or easily, and could also involve invoking a notwithstanding clause to override the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. What’s your take?What are your thoughts on the U.K.’s laws about offensive communications? Should Canada consider altering our free speech law? Does our current system provide too high a barrier to changing laws?

The legal prosecution of Twitter users in the U.K. raises questions about the line between protecting free speech and limiting hate speech or libelous comments.Here in Canada, as the law currently stands, a person can only be prosecuted for something they’ve posted on social media if that posting is criminally libelous or incites hatred. If we wanted to amend legislation surrounding free speech, it would not happen quickly or easily, and could also involve invoking a notwithstanding clause to override the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. What’s your take?What are your thoughts on the U.K.’s laws about offensive communications? Should Canada consider altering our free speech law? Does our current system provide too high a barrier to changing laws?

Maybe it’s because media concentration is accelerating. Or maybe it’s because new players are getting into the game. Maybe it’s because TV and radio are desperate to try new things as they compete for attention with the Internet. Or maybe it’s just because it’s 2012 and the world is going to end soon. Either way, a lot is changing in local television and radio this fall.A single hearing of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, Sept. 10 in Montreal, will decide the fate of three radio stations in the city, and whether one big Montreal-based media conglomerate (BCE) can buy another (Astral Media).

http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/changes coming radio Montreal/7073497/story.html