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Beginning Monday, changes in Wikipedia’s terms of use will require anyone paid to edit articles to disclose that arrangement. Katherine Maher, the nonprofit Wikimedia Foundation’s chief communications officer, said the changes address a sentiment among volunteer editors that, “we’re not an advertising service; we’re an encyclopedia.” A blog post announcing the changes on Monday said in part: “Undisclosed paid advocacy editing is a black hat practice that can threaten the trust of Wikimedia’s volunteers and readers. We have serious concerns about the way that such editing affects the neutrality and reliability of Wikipedia.”

Strictly speaking, these reporters do not conform to the definition of journalists because in China they are often entrusted with multiple duties — such as being ad salesmen and handling publicity — in addition to their editorial tasks. The nature of these multiple functions creates obvious conflicts of interest. And it is the newspapers that arrange their jobs this way.
The truth is that compared to the taker of “mouth-sealing fees,” the state press is much more unscrupulous than the individual journalists on their payrolls. For instance, a few years ago CCTV revealed abuses by Baidu, the major Internet services company whose pay-per-click ad system led to fraud. Baidu search results helped send junk information designed to mislead the public. When this was exposed, many people predicted that Baidu would have to pay a fortune to silence CCTV from further reporting.
Sure enough, as Baidu’s chief financial officer, Jennifer Li, later confirmed, Baidu’s “marketing expenses” soared by more than 40 million yuan in the quarter following the scandal. The vast majority of these marketing-related expenses were given to CCTV.

THE media sector in South Africa is undergoing rapid transformation, which is leading to a divergence in share-price performance between traditional print publishers and companies that focus on new-generation content such as broadcasting and online media.JSE-listed media companies are AME (African Media and Entertainment), Kagiso, Naspers, Caxton and Times Media Group (formerly Avusa).The latter two companies are primarily exposed to the printing and publishing sectors, whereas the first three are in the broadcasting and entertainment sector. The difference in share performance between the two groups is telling.AME shares have risen by 29.4% over the past 12 months to September 18, Kagiso was up 16.6% and Naspers increased 39.6%.In contrast Avusa was down 1.7% for the 12 months before its shares were suspended pending its delisting. Although Caxton’s share price rose 12%, it lagged the top performers in the sector.

THE media sector in South Africa is undergoing rapid transformation, which is leading to a divergence in share-price performance between traditional print publishers and companies that focus on new-generation content such as broadcasting and online media.JSE-listed media companies are AME (African Media and Entertainment), Kagiso, Naspers, Caxton and Times Media Group (formerly Avusa).The latter two companies are primarily exposed to the printing and publishing sectors, whereas the first three are in the broadcasting and entertainment sector. The difference in share performance between the two groups is telling.AME shares have risen by 29.4% over the past 12 months to September 18, Kagiso was up 16.6% and Naspers increased 39.6%.In contrast Avusa was down 1.7% for the 12 months before its shares were suspended pending its delisting. Although Caxton’s share price rose 12%, it lagged the top performers in the sector.