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The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

In a crisis situation, social networks are overloaded with situational updates, calls for relief, reports of new developments, and rescue information. Reporting the right information is often critical in shaping responses from the public and relief workers; it can literally be a matter of life or death.

The Handbook prescribes best practice advice on how to verify and use this information provided by the crowd, as well as actionable advice to facilitate disaster preparedness in newsrooms.

While it primarily targets journalists and aid providers, the Handbook can be used by anyone. It’s advice and guidance are valuable whether you are a news journalist, citizen reporter, relief responder, volunteer, journalism school student, emergency communication specialist, or an academic researching social media.

As relativism has spread from universities to newsrooms, the epistemic culture of journalism is going through a conceptual change that is bound to have profound effects on the democratically relevant knowledge-seeking enterprise, with its various practical forms. Indeed, objectivity has already been replaced by many journalists and journalistic organizations with the alternative ideals of “fairness”, “balance”, “neutrality” and “transparency

”[…] journalism is also an interesting epistemic practice for studying and developing a pragmatist conception of objective knowledge”, suggests Aki Petteri Lehtinen, of the University of Helsinki, in a paper to be delivered at the First European Pragmatism Conference, 19–21 September 2012, Rome, Italy.

As relativism has spread from universities to newsrooms, the epistemic culture of journalism is going through a conceptual change that is bound to have profound effects on the democratically relevant knowledge-seeking enterprise, with its various practical forms. Indeed, objectivity has already been replaced by many journalists and journalistic organizations with the alternative ideals of “fairness”, “balance”, “neutrality” and “transparency”

“[…] journalism is also an interesting epistemic practice for studying and developing a pragmatist conception of objective knowledge”, suggests Aki Petteri Lehtinen, of the University of Helsinki, in a paper to be delivered at the First European Pragmatism Conference, 19–21 September 2012, Rome, Italy.

But the prominence of more extreme groups in the media could also be the result of journalists seeking to uphold objectivity and fairness in their reporting. Journalists may be attempting to maintain balance in their reporting by incorporating the views of two or more polarized groups, thus telling both sides of the story. The more nuanced and less sectarian views of moderate groups, on the other hand, bring an element of ambiguity to the story, potentially making it harder to explain.
“Selecting two opposing views — say very conservative and very liberal — thus becomes a shortcut for a range of views,” McCluskey and Kim explained. “In this way, journalists appear to have a ‘third-person’ view maintaining objectivity as a professional value. Moderate views, on the other hand, simply are less easy to define as representing a viewpoint than polarized left–right opinions. The large number of articles analyzed points toward an overall trend of balance among ideological extremes.

False balance may silence coverage of moderate views: study | The Raw Story

It’s what’s called a “ding-dong” on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme…

But the prominence of more extreme groups in the media could also be the result of journalists seeking to uphold objectivity and fairness in their reporting. Journalists may be attempting to maintain balance in their reporting by incorporating the views of two or more polarized groups, thus telling both sides of the story. The more nuanced and less sectarian views of moderate groups, on the other hand, bring an element of ambiguity to the story, potentially making it harder to explain.
“Selecting two opposing views — say very conservative and very liberal — thus becomes a shortcut for a range of views,” McCluskey and Kim explained. “In this way, journalists appear to have a ‘third-person’ view maintaining objectivity as a professional value. Moderate views, on the other hand, simply are less easy to define as representing a viewpoint than polarized left–right opinions. The large number of articles analyzed points toward an overall trend of balance among ideological extremes.”

False balance may silence coverage of moderate views: study | The Raw Story

It’s what’s called a “ding-dong” on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme…